car audio amp question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by jericko, Apr 21, 2008.

  1. jericko

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 21, 2008
    im lost i want to design a car audio amplifier of about 500W but i cant figure out the power supply, will i need a oscillator of sorts to power the amplifier circuit or can i make the input signal from deck to amp ride on a positive DC value and cut it out later on. or is both possiable.

    im also a little stuck on which type of transistors to use, my father said perhaps darlington transistors because of the switching speeds but not quite sure if they'll be able to handle the heat.

    any help would be nice, thanks.

    ps. if anyone knows of a good site that would help with car audio amps that would help alot.
  2. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    Personally, i suggest you to buy one and not to build it. i know how you will feel if you build it your own but if you buy it it will be cheaper and better.
  3. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    There is a site that is full of good audio amplifier and accessory circuits. It has a switching power supply for a car amplifier that can power 350W to 390W of amplifiers.
    Its dual polarity output voltages can be designed for a single 390W amp or six 65W amps. It operates at a high frequency, uses a ferrite make-it-yourself small transformer. It uses power Mosfets. Here is a link to the power supply project:
  4. SgtWookie


    Jul 17, 2007
    It's absurd and foolish to put such a powerful amplifier in a vehicle.

    Even with 100W cranked up, you can't hear emergency vehicles.

    You will soon be deaf, if you're not killed first due to being distracted from your primary function: keeping your vehicle in absolute control at all times, being aware of all of your surroundings.

    With the sound cranked up, you're automatically deaf.

    Drive defensively. Windows partly down, music at low volume.

    You'll live longer. So will the drivers around you.
  5. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    Good music is not continuously full blast. Its average is 12dB less than its peak so if the peak power is 100W then its average power is only 6.25W. You can feel the momentary peak power but its duration is low so it is not deafening.