Capacitors identify

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by CceWeb, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. CceWeb

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2014
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    Hi .I am new to this forum so if I make some mistakes please forgive me.
    I have 3 capacitors and I am trying to identify them to install one in my guitar.Can someone tell me if are they ceramic or polyestar or polypropylene.I have attached a picture with all 3.Thanks in advance.
    P.S Is maybe the middle one a Sparaque orange drop cap?
     
  2. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    1. 22000pF (22nF) 60v polyester
    2. 47000pF (47nF) 630v HV polyester
    3. 470000pF (470nF or 0.47uF) 450v HV polyester

    Sorry I'm not sure what audio people refer to as an "orange drop" cap, but the middle cap with the orange colour is a standard HV polyester cap. :)
     
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  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    "Orange Drop" Sprague brand name polypropylene or polyester cap.

    None of those are Sprague but they are all the right type for guitars and guitar amps. It's just that you don't need any hundred+ volt capacitors in a guitar that would be lucky to make 10 volts peak, even if you hit it with a hammer. The high voltage caps are for the amplifier, but they will still work in a guitar. Just way over built.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2014
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  4. CceWeb

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 1, 2014
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    Thank you guys for your help.Everything is clear now.So I will install the first cap,the small one.I just hoped maybe one of them is it gonna be a polypropylene.I heard that somehow people like them over the polyester but some of them can't hear any difference.Anyway this are some caps I found on some bords I had at my work so I did not pay anything for them.
    Thanks again.This is realy a good forum.Glad that I joined it.Peace to eveybody.
     
  5. Kermit2

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    Feb 5, 2010
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    99.999% of the world will NEVER be able to hear a difference. for the rest it is something to discuss over drinks and a smoke.
     
  6. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    I say play and let the 'purist' be d am ed damned I say.
     
  7. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    obviously I have reached my limit for the night :(
     
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    One of my best friends is an audiophool.:D
    That's why I know about these things.
     
  9. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    we should meet and discuss it over drinks... oh wait.
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    oh wait...you've reached your limit for the night...and I don't drink. It makes me stupid(er).:D
     
  11. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    The cap in an electric guitar is in the tone control circuit.

    It has a pot (rheostat) in series with the cap, going to ground. As the resistance of the pot decreases it "shorts out" more of the higher frequencies to ground, so it is a "high cut" system.

    When the tone pot is at the bass-iest position it is shorted and the cap is just placed across the signal to short a lot of high freq signal to ground.

    It is a really crude and nasty high-cut system and no brand or style of cap is going to make any audible difference at all.

    Every tone cap I have seen was a ceramic type, that looked like this;

    [​IMG]

    Sorry I don't know the value, from memory but a 30 second google took me to the Seymour Duncan pickups site, where there is some good info on cap values;

    http://www.seymourduncan.com/tonefiend/guitar/customize-your-caps/

    And from that page I'll quote what the expert says regarding the cap type;

    Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
     
  12. Metalmann

    Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    "I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications."




    Totally agree.
    There is way too much hype/propaganda, in musical forums.
     
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