Capacitor help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Xqizit, May 9, 2015.

  1. Xqizit

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 9, 2015
    3
    0
    Hi,

    My old super 8mm projector blew a capacitor and I am struggling to find the right replacement.
    The projector is a Yashica 8PC-N and is about 35 years old.

    When it blew it had aluminium foil type material coming out of it.

    I was wondering if you could help me.

    It is marked as follows:

    OIL
    CP-C
    .1uF
    (M)
    400WV

    Does the WV mean working voltage or "Watt Volts"?
    Does the CP-C mean anything?


    What type of capacitor is this? crossover? electrolyte? both?

    The second attachment is a photo of another capacitor which looks to be the same type but probably a different brand.

    I have gone to my local electronics shop but was unable to find a suitable replacement.

    Does the volt rating have to be exactly the same or can i just get one which is greater e.g. 600V

    Any help you can give is very much appreciated.

    Thanks
    Joe

    IMG_4097.JPG IMG_4098.JPG
     
  2. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
    4,998
    745
    looks like a 100nF (0.1uF) 400V cap, oil wound type for AC use, get one with the same voltage or higher.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2015
  3. Xqizit

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 9, 2015
    3
    0
    Thanks for the reply.

    Does this fall under a crossover type capacitor?
     
  4. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
    5,450
    1,066
    WV means "working voltage"
     
  5. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
    1,957
    1,215
    I think you mean Non-Polarized, and yes, it does appear to be non-polarized.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,553
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    A WIMA MKP4 .1υf 400vw would be a replacement, probabally superior to the original.
    Max.
     
  7. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,542
    1,251
    And there probably is no reason to go with an oil type. A 0.1 uF film type (polyester, metalized mylar, etc.) with the same voltage rating will work, and probably last longer.

    ak
     
  8. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    IIRC: those ones were oil filled paper dielectric - pretty sure they didn't bother with things like X-class mains filter ratings that long ago.

    The original 400V rating is cutting it a bit fine, the peak value of 230VAC is in the vicinity of 320V - then there's any spikes/noise etc on top of that.

    For a bodge - use at least 600V rating. Or better; a 275VAC mains filter cap.
     
    cmartinez likes this.
  9. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If its a mains filter - use at least 600V rating for 230VAC, and that's a bodge!

    It certainly looks like what they used to use for mains filters back in the day - if so; it should be replaced with a part that conforms to present day mains filter cap regulations.
     
  10. Xqizit

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 9, 2015
    3
    0
    Thanks for all your help everyone.

    I bought this one. I hope it's the right one.

    image.jpg
     
  11. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    If its a mains filter cap for 230V - I'm guessing that will probably go bang a fair bit quicker than the one that's been there 35 years.

    It needs to be the correct type of mains filter capacitor with the X2 specification marking.

    Rather than buying another to get the right sort - anything recently manufactured that has an SMPSU will have filter capacitors you can salvage - an old ATX PC PSU would be a good candidate, the ones in set top boxes tend to be less than 104, but you could still parallel to make up the value.
     
  12. Paul del Rosario

    New Member

    May 29, 2015
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    I have a similar capacitor problem from a Sekonic 80p. Does anyone know how to describe this / find it on the Net? I think this is what's written on it ".02+.001X2μF"
    image.jpg
     
  13. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Does it have 3 wires? - If so its almost certainly a mains filter containing a pair of capacitors.

    Shouldn't be any problem using individual capacitors, but they must be the X2 grade specified in the regs for present day mains filters.
     
  14. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,553
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    I believe that indicates .001μf x2
    Generally the case is a ground/common and each capacitor is one of the leads on each end to case.
    Max.
     
  15. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    I've seen various configurations - some have 2 leads at one end and only one at the other. If the case is the earth connection, there's invariably a solder tag attached - can't ever remember seeing one that relied entirely on clamping to the chassis for the earth. Although a few equipment manufacturers didn't bother soldering a wire to the solder tag
     
  16. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    The one in the pic appears to have a screw/Gnd tab attached and a lead at each end. Ceramic insulation.
    Max.
     
  17. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Looks like button style terminals with soldered in wires to me, there appears to be the remains of a broken off wire at the obscured far end, and it looks painted judging by the chipped areas, and its not a good shape for chassis clamping/earthing anyway.
     
  18. Paul del Rosario

    New Member

    May 29, 2015
    3
    0
    Thanks for all the feedback.
    Yes. The point where I'm holding it with the pliers was grounded to the chassis and then there was one wire from each end.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  19. Paul del Rosario

    New Member

    May 29, 2015
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    11212160_10205771722386593_6134193134652299451_o.jpg
    This is what it looked like before I removed it from the projector.
     
  20. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,553
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