Capacitor Bank Help.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by GTeclips, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
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    0
    Hello everyone, I'm not sure if "General Electronics Chat" is the right place for this thread, so sorry if that is the case.

    I am trying to make a capacitor bank out of x5 35V 1000μf capacitors, but sadly, I'm a noob when it comes to (Well... Really all electronics) capacitors.

    I have searched for diagrams on Google, but not much help, or maybe I'm just oblivious. If any of you would help me by perhaps showing me a diagram or something of that nature of a proper capacitor bank, I would be extremely thankful!

    Thank you for viewing!
     
  2. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
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    488
    Not sure if you can call 5x 1000uF call a capacitor "bank". :)

    Just connect them in parallel , use short, large diameter wires.

    What is it for ?
     
  3. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
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    0
    OK, thank you.

    I'm testing various capacitors on a coil to see what kind of "emp" affect I will get. I realize I will need a lot higher voltage capacitors to get an effective one, but I just want to see if I can get anything out of 'em.

    *EDIT* By the way, what voltage of capacitor and how many of them would you recommend for a half decent emp device?
    (Emp device = Device that can derp an old phone from about a foot away.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012
  4. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
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    5000uF at 35V (or less) is definitely not enough. Depending on what you want to do with that EMP you would need something like a few mF to a few tens (or hundreds) of mF, at a much higher voltage. Something like a few hundred volts.

    In general, if you want to rapidly discharge capacitors make sure that the inductance of all wires between the capacitors and the bank and the load (your coil) is as small as possible. That means: Short thick traces or wires. The inductance limits the rate of discharge current. Also use capacitors that have low ESR. You find this information in their datasheet.

    If you experiment with higher voltages make sure you use the proper safety equipment. Accidently shorting charged capacitors can create sparks (use eye protection) and touching charged high voltage caps may cause serious injury or death.

    Edit: Just saw your edit. I can't tell how much would be needed to do what you plan to do. Certainly a lot.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012
  5. GTeclips

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 18, 2012
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    Thank you for the advise, I will have to look into a lot bigger capacitors. I would imagine that safety would be a must with that amounts of volts.
     
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