Can windshield wiper motor be made to reverse

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by littlelmo, Sep 21, 2012.

  1. littlelmo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2012
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    I have a 69 Plymouth wiper motor with a four wire connector and the body is ground. The colors or red, brown, green and blue. It will run when + voltage is applied to brown wire and body grounded to - post of battery. No other combination I found will make the motor run. I can not get the motor run in reverse. Is there a way to make this motor run in reverse also? Thanks for any and all responses.

    PS: Just found this site and it has tons of good info. I like reading through the forums even if most of it is way over my head.
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    I found this bit of part number descriptions.
    Sounds like you have a 3 speed unit.
    Google is the way to find these things, don't scrimp on search terms...try lots of combos :)

    [​IMG]
     
  3. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Instead of a three speed motor, as Kermit said, it is probably a two speed motor. The other wire is for a "park" switch, so the motor stops at a certain spot every time.

    As to making it run in reverse, it "could" be done. The ground brush holder would need to be reworked to insulate the brush from ground. Not an easy job, but possible.

    When I said "could", that is depending on the brush positioning being centered on the commutator. Some wiper motors have offset brushes to lower "noise" in the electrical system.

    You don't say what the motor will be used for. There are other small motors in a car that are reversible. Without a rework.
     
  4. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
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    Does it have permanent magnet or electromagnetic pole shoes?

    If electromagnetic then it is a simple case of just reversing the direction of the current through the field windings.
     
  5. littlelmo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2012
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    Thanks for the replies, it is a two speed motor two of the wires are for the parking of the arms. I realized this when I removed the cover off the gear box. I swapped the wires and it still ran forward so changing the polarity does not help. What is involved in removing the ground from the brushes. I am willing to try this after all this is a diy project. I am going to use the motor to pull items up an incline from 1st floor to loft and then return the sled back down.
    Thanks
     
  6. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
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    If it continued to rotate in the same direction after you reversed the polarity then it sounds like a wound field motor, the only other possibility is diodes on the input circuit which is highly unlikely on a motor from 1969.

    Removing the ground from the brushes is not going to change your direction og rotation if it hasn't changed after reversing the supply current polarity.
    If it has a wound field just reverse the direction of current to the field only.
     
  7. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Yes you can reverse the motor, they are usually series field motors, so you need to swap either the field windings or the brushes round, but the mechanics may get stuck.
     
  8. littlelmo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2012
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    Again thanks and it is a wound field motor so I will try swapping them around tomorrow and see what happens.
    Thanks all, you have been a big help getting me on the right track.
     
  9. cork_ie

    Member

    Oct 8, 2011
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    I haven't seen them in years. Lucas DR1 was the model as far as I remember. The last things that had a series field motor was the very early Mini's, Morris Minors, Mk V1 Jag and the Series 2 Landrover. I think they might have been in the RR Shadow1 as well. (I'll bet you our U.S. friends haven't a clue what we are talking about)


    The Permanent Magnet were a million miles better. The SF motor types just went to toast if the drive cable (remember those) went tight, as most British cars used have only 2 fuses both 35A and none of the head/dip lighting circuits had a fuse of any sort.
    Oh! for the days of simple car electrics,
     
  10. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Yes i remember the Ford Anglia as i had one that is what i was referring to, not the modern ones.:rolleyes:
     
  11. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    I have a 1960's Ford wiper motor here, it has a series would field (and no access to the field wires) and will only run in one direction. It has the power of a Bull!

    Modern wiper motors use smaller perm mag motors and are reversible, but have very little power in comparison.

    In old DC motors especially, the perm mag technology was crap in those days so they will usually have wound fields.
     
  12. littlelmo

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 19, 2012
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    0
    Just wanted to say thanks again as I took the motor and removed the park wires and played with the remaining wires and now I have a motor that runs in forward and reverse. Now off to complete my project.
    Thanks everyone that responded.
     
  13. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    I'm totally confounded as to why this thread isn't locked??
     
  14. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    Best I can figure-
    If you take parts off a car and play with them and build something(not a car) with it then your good.
    If you put something IN a car then we have to disappoint you and tell you that we want to help but our company legal team has decided it's unsafe for average people to be playing around with a car, and besides 'someone might get hurt', so you'll just have to go play on the internet and get your information from other people who are not worried about legal teams(because their dumb or something, or have no money to lose)

    Does that explain it?

    Yes>maybe...no?
     
  15. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    Automotive windshield wiper motors are often used in non-automotive applications - they are a common source of power for homebuilt Halloween props, for example.
     
  16. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Yep, their simple worm drive gearbox will make a ton of torque from a simple commonly available motor, good for things like gate opening, robot drive etc.

    They can be bought from robot and EV shops and used for many purposes. :)
     
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