Can this voltage metre test 1.5v batteries?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Helplessnewbie, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    Hi! I inherited this voltage metre from my uncle, who had it for years. The problem is, I don't know how to use it. All the Youtube videos refer to more recent metres. I would like to test 1.5v batteries but don't know how to set it or even know if it can work. Can anyone help?

    voltagemetre.jpg
     
  2. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    You plug the negative wire into the COM. - DC.+Ω terminal, and the positive into the 6V terminal.
     
  3. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    I thought a "Metre" was a unit of length, not a voltage....
     
  4. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    You're right. I did say my name was Helplessnewbie.
     
  5. bwilliams60

    Active Member

    Nov 18, 2012
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    When you read the voltage, you will look at the three black scales under DCV. The bottom one is 0 - 6 VDC. Each increment is 0.2 VDC. Make sure the batteries in the meter are good. Chances are that they are not if they have been sitting around for quite some time.
     
  6. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    Hi, I did as you said and tested a battery that I tested with a simpler meter but nothing happens. If anything, the meter moves a tad to the left!
     
  7. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    You say that the needle went left.
    It looks like the common is +DC.
    Try this:

    helplessnewbie_meter_with comments.jpg


    Bertus
     
  8. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    Thanks Bertus!!! That worked. Someone told me that the wires should be in the opposite position - the red wire in 6V and the black in DC+ Infinity). Which should it be?

    Thanks,
    Shawn


     
  9. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    It can be that your vintage meter uses the + as common.
    The newer meters all use the - as common.

    Bertus
     
  10. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Also note that if by "test" you mean give a pass/fail indication, most meters don't do this. No load voltage isn't a good indicator of remaining capacity.
     
  11. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    Wow that is one beautiful antique! One think everyone missed. You should have a load when testing batteries. A dead battery could read the battery level with no load. You really would be better off with a cheap battery tester.
     
  12. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    A load for the battery can be a simple 100 ohms resistor. Put that across the two terminals and measure voltage. Measure voltage without the resistor and then determine if the voltage under load is much different that without the load. If the voltage changes by more than 15% or so, it is dead. That is for typical AA batteries. If you are testing little button cell batteries for watches or hearing aids, use a 4700 or 10k resistor. Test on a new battery to get the feeling of how it should respond.

    Also, your meter is not going to show a big difference since you have a 6-volt scale. You might want to buy a nice digital meter - available for $5 and up. The seemingly crappy $5 (sometimes free with coupon) meter from harbor freight will be better than the one you have.
     
  13. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

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    Yep but a battery tester is a lot easier. :)
     
    GopherT likes this.
  14. dl324

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    And you had the nerve to accuse me of not being able to read...
     
  15. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    The question is, how much load does the meter itself put on the source?
     
  16. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    Looking at the left lower corner it says 2000Ω/V.
    This means that the 6 Volts range has a resistance of 6 X 2000Ω = 12kΩ.
    The 30 Volts range : 30 X 2000Ω = 60kΩ.
    The 150 Volts range : 150 X 2000Ω = 300kΩ.
    And the 600 Volts range : 600 X 2000 = 1200kΩ.

    Most Digital Multimeters nowerdays will have an input resistance of 20 MΩ, for comparison.

    Bertus
     
  17. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    Yes, I got a cheap batter tester for Christmas. That's when Mom showed me this old meter that my uncle used to have and she was wondering if I wanted it. It's still in terrific shape and comes in its own leather case!!
     
  18. Helplessnewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 28, 2015
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    Thanks for your response!!
     
  19. spinnaker

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    Oct 29, 2009
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    Display it on your bench. It is a nice antique. :)
     
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