Can sine wave signal compressed?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by tojeena, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. tojeena

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 2, 2009
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    Can sine wave signal compressed?
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Yes
    .......
     
  3. bluebrakes

    Active Member

    Oct 17, 2009
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    yeah there are plenty of frequency divider circuits on the net. Ranging from the simple 555 timer based to complex PIC based ones.
     
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  4. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    What do you mean by "compressed"?
     
  5. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    If you are referring to using an FFT of a signal, as per your previous threads, sine is as simple as it gets, a single pulse in the frequency domain.
     
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  6. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    It will also compress well if in the digital domain, due to the amount of repetition. This is essentially stating what Tschuck stated about analog compression, single spike in frequency domain.
     
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  7. tojeena

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 2, 2009
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    So is there any use of making any algorithms for compressing it?Since its got a single pulse.For applying the compression methods it would be better to go with speech or image signals right?or sine wave?
     
  8. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    If it is only a single cycle (pulse), not much compression can be done, compared to, say 1000 cycles of the same sinewave, where compression would put one copy of the sinewave into the "dictionary", then note that dictionary entry occurs 1,000 times.

    Only one copy of a full cycle needs to be saved. I'm lying, since a sinewave is mirrored in a few quadrants, but that's the basic idea. However, that is only for block compression, as is not applicable for stream compression. Block compression is "in place", a file needs to be smaller, and is compressed with the dictionary, indexes, and coefficients. (See gzip, zip, bzip2, etc). With streams, the program no longer has the luxury of examining the entire signal before building a compression stream to be sent concurrent with incoming data.

    There are many compression algorithms in common use, both block and stream. Which one is optimal is entirely dependent on what other content is mixed with the sinewave, if there is another signal time consistent with the sinewave (such as video with audio), etc.

    I believe it is the Discrete Hilbert Transform that gives the sum of square waves to define any wave, the same way a DFT gives the sum of sine waves to make up any wave. Sometimes one is better than the other. Somebody correct me on the name of the square wave transform, I use it, but am having a brain fart right now...
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
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