Can I use this relay?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by brightside., Dec 15, 2008.

  1. brightside.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 15, 2008
    3
    0
    I am doing a simple project in which I took out the receiver cicuitboard of a wirelessly controlled toy car, and will hook up the Forward/Reverse and Left/Right terminals of it to a relay, which will then be connected to a bulb and the 220V mains supply. This way, when I use the remote control of the wireless toy car and push the F/R stick or the L/R stick, the bulbs should light up.

    The circuit should look something like this:

    [​IMG]

    The question is that I was supposed to use SPDT relays for this, but the one I was able to buy has 6 terminals, I've never used a relay like this before. I am not sure what its Normally Open, Normally Closed and Common terminals are.

    I found this page which gives info on it:

    http://www.szjltd.com/products/hke/HRS1(H).htm

    And this is the diagram of its inside, can anyone tell me if the terminals on the left are NO/NC and the two on the right are Common? Am I correct in thinking that?
    [​IMG]
     
  2. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
    1,542
    102
    The datasheet of the relay says it is for maximum of 120V AC only. You cannot use it for 220V or else it might fail and kill someone.

    When one looks at the pinout view, one need to be sure whether it is the top view or the bottom view. The top view is useful for designing PCB and the bottom view useful for making manual soldering connections.

    Because the view provided in the original datasheet uses dotted line, I'm assuming it is the top view.
     
  3. brightside.

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 15, 2008
    3
    0
    Thanks for clearing up the bottom/top view confusion. And how did I not pay attention to the max voltage rating of the relay! doh! I guess I can use a 220V--->110V step down transformer for this, but just getting a new 220V relay would be much easier.
     
  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    Can the receiver circuit supply enough voltage and current to operate the relays?
     
  5. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    4,846
    63
    I think that you have to use ground and one of the right/left/forward/reverse each time as for the relay to work.
     
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