Can anyone identify this protoboard?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Sparky49, May 26, 2012.

  1. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Hi everyone. :)

    Can anyone identify this protoboard?

    http://www.homebrewcpu.com/Pictures/mem_3.jpg

    I'm not going to replicate that whole project (!), but I think the boards look very useful for something I'm planning on...

    I've tried Googling the numbers on the sides but nothing - unless I'm missing something!

    Quite possible.

    Anyhow, many thanks for your time guys,

    Sparky. :)
     
  2. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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  3. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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  4. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
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    Perhaps something like the VME64 series MrChips posted but somewhat larger. This is still only half the size of the one in your photo.

    http://www.twinind.com/catalog_detail.php?id=47

    The connectors appear to be 3 row, 96 position DIN like this extender.

    http://www.vectorelect.com/Product/Extenders/UEB220-6U.htm

    This VME prototyping board is very nice though possibly not large enough. Syntax boards are very good quality but hard to find.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a source: http://www.circuitspecialists.com/pc122903.html
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  5. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    What a board!

    What do you think he had?

    This?
    [​IMG]

    Or this?
    [​IMG]

    I have none of them, and never used one...

    What are you up to Sparky49?
     
  6. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    [​IMG]

    One of these!!!

    What am I up to... Starting a collection of proto typing boards. ;)

    No, seriously, I thought I'd give this project a try. ;)

    No, seriously, I thought I'd design my own quad-core processor made out of TDL. ;)

    No seriously... Well you'll just have to wait and see!!! Mwhahahahahaha!! :D
     
  7. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
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    Ok, I'll guess I'll brush dust off of the "You'll-have-to-wait-and-see-gen." :)
     
    Sparky49 likes this.
  8. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Don't worry - most of you will be outside the blast radius if things go wrong!!!!
     
  9. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    And by most of you... I mean Lightfire and R!f@@...
     
  10. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    You have a neat work area, ah and the good old days where the freezer had

    a couple of bottles of cold wine. I don't see any head mags.
     
  11. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    OMG! An elusive posting by Loosewire outside the Off topic!!

    ;)
     
  12. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Is it even possible to use wire wrap pins with a regular proto board? The wire wrap boards I've seen are made from thicker and harder fiberglas, with no copper pads. Thicker and harder to keep the pins from wobbling around.
     
  13. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    Wire wrap is a completely insane concept. I think only Americans ever really got into it.
     
  14. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    I must admit, I see the potential for it.

    Imagine the stress/cost of producing PCBs or using stripboard for that project!
     
  15. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Well, coming from the guy who owns FOUR of these:[​IMG]

    Nope, I don't do wire wrap any more, though it was fairly useful for it's time. I use SMD parts as much as possible so there are no leads to deal with. The "0805" size (nominal .05" wide and .08" long) fit between pads on 0.1" protoboards just fine. IC's in DIP packages are great, as are lots of other sizes when you have SOIC or QFN to DIP adapter boards, and I stock many sizes in advance of need.

    I don't use either end of that tool, I use the middle, which is a stripper. I found a decent source for 30AWG wire in 10 colors on EBay and use that for point to point connections, plus some uninsulated solid 26AWG for power busing.

    My latest board is in the link below. I have several boards from a system inserted here so I can test it out before dividing it up and getting some PCBs made. Note above and below the PIC (40 pin DIP) the connectors are there for an alphanumeric display which was unplugged to see the IC that lives below it.
     
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  16. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    A lot of early computers were wire wrap in the beginning. The last place I worked, some of the machines (complex automotive electrical component building machines) still had wire wrap logic boards in them. But then they also used wire coating "braiders" from the 1920s too. And this was a multi-national company.

    The wire wrap concept is said to make joints that exceed soldering for electrical integrity.
     
  17. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    There is a reason that technique is no longer used. It has a lifespan about 10 years give or take before it gets flaky. It was used for real for manufacturing for a long time, until it became obvious it was not going to last 20 years, the original outer projected lifespan.
     
  18. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
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    Was wire wrap used in the early American space program because it's short term reliability is superior to solder or is this just another example of mis-information my ageing brain has wrongly processed?
     
  19. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    It was never superior, it was both simpler and cheaper. I suspect this was more true of small runs though.

    I do remember seeing it done for primitive computers that I got to work on.
     
  20. Sparky49

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    This is great. It's is interesting to hear about electronics in the past.

    You guys need to write this down. There is always someone interested in what you write.
     
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