Buying Jyetech DSO 062

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Insertname, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. Insertname

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2011
    12
    0
    Has anyone bought this scope and received it? I'm looking to buy the kit and solder it together but I want to buy from a reputable supplier so I'm not throwing my money away.

    Thanks for the help once again guys :)
     
  2. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    Hmmm, a 1 MHz scope for $65 or so. If it's reasonably straightforward to build the kit and it works as advertised, it might be a good deal. If you do buy it, keep notes and take pictures, then post your experiences here.
     
  3. Insertname

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2011
    12
    0
    Good idea. There's a little bit going around the web but I can't seem to find as much info as I'd like. There's a few videos up on Youtube as well. I just can't seem to find anyone citing where they got it.
     
  4. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    213
    1 MHz.

    Practical limit, audio circuits, basic oscillators.

    Forget most microcontrollers, and interface buses (I2C, SPI, etc.) UART, maybe at low speeds.

    I don't know why people don't buy an old analog oscilloscope. On eBay people are selling analog oscilloscopes with 20x - 50x the bandwidth of that, for less than the price of that kit, which will be useful.

    - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dual-Channe...24681?pt=BI_Oscilloscopes&hash=item2eb7ac66e9 (about $50 incl. shipping in USA)
    - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Philips-PM3...32712?pt=BI_Oscilloscopes&hash=item2c5f0cc248 (QUAD CHANNEL... grab it before it goes!!)

    and many more...

    Just make sure they are tested and working and you will get a very useful tool which will serve you well for years.

    An analog oscilloscope will also teach you how to use an oscilloscope properly, including setting it up but also reading the scale.

    If you decide to upgrade, go to an old (1990s) digital oscilloscope or if you have some additional funds spare something like a Rigol DS1052E, around $350.
     
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    People's needs/wants are different. Personally, I'll forego the analog scope because, overall, I like digital scopes better for my needs. If I really need one I'll get out the Phillips scope I bought in the 70's.

    Still, for $65, you'll get something that you can slip into a pocket. I can think of a number of times where I wouldn't have minded a 1 MHz scope in my pocket to resolve some weird measurement I was getting...

    For bench use, though, I'm with you Tom. I'll stick with my older HP digital scope. I'd go nuts if I didn't have the knobs and buttons I'm used to -- picking settings from menus or softkeys drives me crazy. (My wife pipes up in the background and says, "Oh, so no change then...").
     
  6. Insertname

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2011
    12
    0
    I'm only really starting out so this will do me just fine. I like the hackability of the tool as well as the fact that source code and schematics are available. If there's a simple bug I can fix it myself without having to resort to posting it off.



    Also, why couldn't I analyse I2C? Its data rate is only in the 100s of kbps. Sure, the corners might be rounded but I'd certainly see the fundamental frequencies with 1MHz
     
  7. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    213
    Most I2C I use is 400kHz, which would round the corners off a lot; you wouldn't be able to see potential rise time issues (the scope would be creating its own, you might think you have a problem that isn't there.)
     
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