Burn HEX file into PIC16F88

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by cczone, Jan 5, 2009.

  1. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
    23
    0
    Well basically I have a burner with Microchip PICkit 2 software. However I figure out that it does not support PIC16F88. How am I manage to burn my HEX file? I try to use MPLAB IDE v8.10 with pickit2 software and I get this warning message:
    [​IMG]

    Anyone know the problems? Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  2. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    4,846
    63
    You have to buy a programmer which supports it!
     
  3. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
    23
    0
    Getting this msg in details:

     
  4. futz

    Member

    Dec 14, 2008
    23
    0
    The PICkit 2 definitely does support the 16F88. Look here. I've programmed the 16F88 with PICkit 2 and clones bazillions of times. Works fine.

    If it's not connecting properly you need to look at your connections and your circuit. Scratch out a quicky schematic of what you're doing and post it here.

    BTW you should update your PICkit 2 firmware to 2.55.01. That is not what's causing your problem, but update anyway.
     
  5. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
    23
    0
    Well, thanks. At least I know 16F88 is supported.
    However i always get message where device not supported.
    Here I show an image when i tried to load .HEX file:
    [​IMG]

    Or might be my PIC problem?


    I am using USB ICSP PIC Programmer and UIC00A Socket to program my PIC.
     
  6. futz

    Member

    Dec 14, 2008
    23
    0
    Highly unlikely. PICs are pretty tough. Unless you've done something real bad to it, it's very likely to be fine.


    Ok, looks like a PICkit 2 clone. Fine. Is there some good reason that you're using the ZIF socket? Just plug the chip into your breadboard (or however your circuit is built) and wire up for ICSP. It's the only sensible way to do it.

    ZIFs are slow and tedious for experimentation. Moving the chip back and forth constantly will wear out and break off pins. And it takes too long.

    ICSP is almost instant. The chip stays in your target circuit. Much quicker and easier.

    Here's an example of a typical ICSP setup, with a 16F88 even. ICSP works with all PICs though. See this article on my site for more photos and a schematic.

    [​IMG]

    If you're really stuck on using that ZIF you need to have that chip plugged in in exactly the right place (and correctly oriented), have the switch in the 18-pin position and triple check that your ICSP cable is plugged in correctly so pin 1 is correct at both programmer and ZIF board connector (it should be keyed so you can't do it wrong).

    Here's a little trick that, in some rare cases, can help get a "stuck" chip working. Take a second 16F88 that does work, and get connected with the software. Then swap chips and do an erase. This probably won't help you if yours is a new chip, but if you programmed certain code into your 16F88 that caused this, this trick can sometimes get you going again.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  7. futz

    Member

    Dec 14, 2008
    23
    0
    I had a look at the ICSP pinout on that Cytron programmer. Hate to say it, but the designer is an idiot. Why make things more difficult than necessary?!?! Guess maybe he thought if he made it real difficult to use a breadboard then he'd sell more hardware.

    Anyway, to do ICSP easily you'll have to build a custom cable (not difficult) to flip a few wires and make the breadboard end possible without a lot of extra complexity. Or you could buy an adapter.

    The genuine PICkit 2 ICSP (and the Blueroom Junebug) is pinned out sensibly, like this:
    1. VPP
    2. 5V
    3. GND
    4. PGD
    5. PGC

    The 6th pin is not connected. So at your breadboard you only need 5 pins in a straight line.

    The Cytron is wired so you have used pins on both sides of the 2x5 connector. Stupid! 2x5 header won't straddle the divider on a breadboard without an adapter.

    I use a 2x5 on the breadboard instead of 1x5 because 2x5 is much less wobbly, and because 2x5 IDC connectors are cheap and easy to build good sturdy cables with, and no soldering. Each inline pair of two pins (5 pairs) are connected to the same thing, so you plug it into one side of the breadboard and connect from there to the PIC. Simple. Do it in the standard PICkit 2 order as laid out above.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2009
  8. futz

    Member

    Dec 14, 2008
    23
    0
    What version of PICkit 2 software are you running (go to Help/About)? Try updating to the latest (at the bottom of this page) and see if that helps.

    The screen grab below is the latest version.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. cczone

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 17, 2008
    23
    0
    Well, thanks futz...it is solved.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2009
  10. futz

    Member

    Dec 14, 2008
    23
    0
    Why not tell us all what it was?!? I'm curious. :p
     
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