Buck Driver for Laser Diodes

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by imraneesa, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4
    Hello Sirs,

    I am not a electronic person but I love it. always wanting to try something. my one of the hobby is lasers. I recently thought of making buck drivers for laser diode. to have a variable current from 1amp to 2amp. when I ask the people to help me nobody came forward to give me the design. i know to make using lm317t but it is linear and gets hot so much.
    all of them making buck driver now. and i don't know how. i came across some buck drivers which have been using in led flash lights. but laserers saying that the buck drivers used for led's are not very good for laser diodes. because laser diodes cannot take any peak current and they are very sensitive.
    Can you help me build one please. that will be very nice. my life will have a joy in doing something i really love.

    Thank you and hoping a positive reply.
     
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    There is a design that another member gave me that might work. I'll look it up and link it.

    It is untested. I have laid out a PCB, and have built one, but never hooked it up to power or LEDs.

    One caution. Any laser diode that takes 1-2 amps is going to be high power. It will blind you or other bystanders in a heart beat, and possibly start fires. Treat LASER technology with respect, it is worse than dealing with fire.

    I'll look up the link and post it when I find it here.
     
  3. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4
    Yes Sir, I always use goggles. I mainly want to make drivers for the people. I want to show them that I can make one and best one. I bought one soon I will post the pic of that. I want to really take this as challenge. and I will always respect safety rules. Thank you so much.
     
  4. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,136
    1,786
    Given the obvious safety concerns are you really going to try and convince us that this falls within the TOS? I think a bit of consistency might be in order here, and I'd be curious to hear other points of view.
     
  5. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4
    I did not understand what you mean. but I want to make this driver to prove somebody that a person with interest can do anything. that's it. and regarding safety, it is important and i always will give it high priority.

     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    Traditionally we worry about beginners and electrical safety. We can not make the world safe.

    Tesla Coils have been discussed on this site, but we try to judge the ability of the user.

    Ultimately the moderators have to make the decisions, but in many cases we discuss issues off line. If you feel this is such a case I will bring it up. The electronics is not an issue, it is safe as houses.

    OK, the core thread I was discussing was

    http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/buck-converter-based-led-power-supply.41320/

    Around post 82 is where it gets interesting.
     
  7. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,645
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  8. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4
    Thank you for the information Mr. Bertus. Iam very much familiar with laders and its safety. But I appreciate your concern. I just want yo build drivers.
     
  9. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4

    Spec:
    Driver Kind
    - Buck
    Currant Range - 5mA to 2900mA with 3A MAX
    Currant Setting - Set with Resistor
    Voltage Input - 5.6v - 16v Depending on the load it can go to 3.7v in

    This is the buck driver that everybody using.
     
  10. imraneesa

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 18, 2014
    184
    4
    Specs:
    Max. output current = 3A
    Input voltage = 3.6V to 16V (upgradable to 25V with higher rated capacitors)
    Low Current Ripple (<= 10mA)
    Overvoltage protection at the output (same voltage as input with no current)
    Overcurrent protection
    Load disconnected protection
    Over temperature protection (150oC at the junction)

    Short Circuit Protection/Reverse polarity at the output
     
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