Breadboard Jumper Wire

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by pilko, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. pilko

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Dec 8, 2008
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    Hi there,
    I am looking for a supplier of good quality, insulated, solid conductor, 22 SWG, pre-stripped and bent breadboard jumper wires in 0.1" multiple lengths.
    Suggestions appreciated,

    Thanks

    pilko.
     
  2. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    Digikey.com or Mouser.com
     
  3. pilko

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Dec 8, 2008
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    BMorse -- thanks for your quick response. Have you tried both the Digikey and Mouser ones, and are they both good quality?

    Regards

    pilko
     
  4. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    I get most of my breadboard supplies from Digikey, and so far I have not been disappointed, mouser is a last resort if Digikey doesn't have what I want/need.

    My .02
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Check this post out, it is cheaper in the long run. Someone followed up with a source for a lead bender.
     
  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Neat is nice, but many assorted lengths of 26 ga telco wire have worked for me for 30 years. There is enough stray capacitance from a breadboard that loops above the surface make no difference.
     
  7. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    I've done the same, but 26 ga tends to slip out of the holes too easily. I find the "official" jumpers give better grab in the long run.

    eric
     
  8. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Yeah, but it is a lot easier to trace problems if it is neat. A rule of thumb I have found to be true over the decades is the neater the project, the more likely it is to work the first time. This also applies to breadboards.

    26 Gauge works OK, but it is also better if the wire is stiffer than normal. I've used 22 Gauge on the older breadboard. Currently I'm using 24 gauge off of roles that was meant for the use.

    22 Gauge works, but it is a bit too heavy. For what it's worth, I've just ordered two lead benders.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  9. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    I agree! Plus less chance of yanking out a loop when making changes to the design....:rolleyes: (I hate that when that happens, it just adds to the problem when trying to debug a circuit!!:mad:)

    My .02
     
  10. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    However, that rule only applies to low frequency stuff. At R.F., all bets are off. In fact, when it comes to radio, the likelihood of a circuit working the first time is inversely proportional to the time spent making it look pretty. Hence the superceding rule: "First you make it work; then you make it pretty." My mantra for 40 years. :D
     
  11. pilko

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Dec 8, 2008
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    Has anyone tried these ?
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Making it neat usually means you have checked and double checked. I think we're going to have to disagree on this one.

    Yep, on the shelf at several electronics outlets. Too expensive for my tastes. Instead, I bought a cheap kitting box from Walmart ($2) and cut and bend my own, then store them when I'm through. I have 6 or so breadboards, and lately have had all of them in use for various projects. I don't use SPICE, I use try and see.
     
  13. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    http://www.tricountyi.net/~randerse/construct.htm

    You're WRONG, Bill! This is how a radio prototype is SUPPOSED to look. It's just so...so..so.. beautiful. It brings a tear to my eyes! :D


    Actually, making nice right angle bends for R.F. conductors can be a major cause of instability. "Ugly" construction method came about as a means of having the SHORTEST possible lead lengths possible in a prototype. Shortest possible lead length usually makes for some pretty scary looking layouts. But form follows function. :)

    eric
     
  14. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  15. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    OK, but how many RF projects have you made using protoboards? Not many I bet. :D
     
  16. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Oh that is so uncool. Only n00bs need to debug a circuit. My circuits work always as expected the first time. Current limiting and fuses is for wieners :rolleyes:
    Laugh ;)
     
  17. russ_hensel

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
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    But if breadboarding uControllers you are going to need loops... and conditionals, and of course switch.
     
  18. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    funny....:D
     
  19. 1010101

    New Member

    Oct 25, 2009
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    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
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