Bowling Alley Pinsetter Monitor

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Pietenpol, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
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    Just joined the forum and looking to design a small monitor box. Powered by either a 9v battery or an ac adapter it will show me whether or not a circuit is closed on the machine. I have 35 individual switches to check. 24 of them I want to have in groups of 3 using tri-color leds. Pit switch (red) Table switch (green) Sweep switch (blue) for example. The last 10 monitor the individual bowling pins. The tricolor switches would have maybe 3 circuits closed at any 1 given time, the pin indicators could have anywhere from 0-10. Here is a link to the commercial version of what I am trying to duplicate. I'm thinking I might be able to build it cleaner, more customized and at a lower rate. This is for my own personal diagnostic use, not for mass duplication.
    http://www.cybernetic.com.au/product_c2atest.html
     
  2. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
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    Here's the general layout I've come up with...all the leds on the left are tri-color. The 2 (momentary contact switches) tri's at the bottom would be the ones that might have multiple combinations at any given time. Everything else is an regular switch.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
    2,574
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    From the link it appears that the monitor plugs into the pin-spotting machine through an existing connector. Since the "switches" are likely used within the machine to control it, they likely attach to internal voltages or grounds. To build your monitor you will need to know what is in the machine (schematic?), or at least the voltage/ground state of each connector pin under each state of machine operation or failure.

    Ken
     
  4. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
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    The connector is a large block with pins. All of the circuits are either connecting two pins together, or ground out a pin. Perhaps monitor was the wrong term to use. I'm just looking to test continuity. Is the switch open or closed.
     
  5. hobbyist

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 10, 2008
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    In order to find out if a switch is open or closed, you need to find out if the pins on the machine connector, are voltages with respect to a common pin, or mechanical connections between 2 pins.

    Then you need to map out the connector so you know what pins are what, if its mechanical connections between 2 pins than you know you could put a monitor LED in series with that 2 pin conection. and so on.

    So I would suggest making a map of the connector block first.
    Then proceed with your monitoring circuit.

    Or are you trying to figure out if a switch is open or closed so you can map out the connector block??
     
  6. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
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    Basically I have switches on the machine. The majority are on/off switches, the momentary contact switches are driven by cams. I need to plug the tester into the machine and manually operate the switches to verify either a solid connection or a bad circuit. All of the switches connect to the 'brain' of the machine with a multi pin connector. I want to plug my tester in and just get a light if I've closed that particular connection. A majority of the circuits are testing a close between that particular pin and ground. Some are between two seperate pins. If a pin-out diagram or schematic would help I can post.
     
  7. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Yes, an absolute must have.

    Ken
     
  8. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
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    [​IMG]

    GP (GPS on my layout) is The Gripper Protection Switch. Momentary contact to sense if all of the fingers to pick up pins are open.

    GS# (The 10 pins) When the gripper closes on the neck of a pin, it grounds out a wire to that particular cell.

    BE (P) On off switch that controls power to the Back End motor. 120v but all I'm interested in is continuity.

    Ball Return = control wiring to the ball return in the bowlers area for turning it on.

    10th frame = Button at ball return allowing bowlers to cycle the pinsetter. (tied into the pbz button)

    OS (Off-spot) Momentary contact switch that is triggered if a pin slides far enough over without falling that the table (triangle with 10 opening for the pins) comes down on top of the standing pin. The table reverses and goes back up leaving the sweep down.

    PBC (Cycle) Allows the mechanic to cycle the machine from the back.

    Bin Sw = Momentary Contact. Lets the machine know that it has a full set of pins ready to be set.

    Mgr Ctrl = Manager Control. Allows the desk to turn on the machine.

    Tbl Sw (Table switch) = Shuts off power to the table motor

    Swp Sw (Sweep switch) = shuts off power to the sweep

    Sws (Sweep run) = momentary contact that allows the mechanics to run the sweep from the back.

    PBZ (Stepper) = momentary contact that allows the mechanic to advance the machine from 1st ball to 2nd ball or 2nd ball to 1st ball.

    Foul = 12v signal from the foul unit in the bowlers area.

    CB (Main Circuit Breaker)
     
  9. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
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    I posted a pin out diagram with brief explanation of the switch types and purposes.....said it needed to be approved tho.
     
  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Did you post it as an attachment, or as a link to another site?

    What kind of file is it? .PNG, .GIF, .PDF?

    Off-topic - are you a Pietenpol builder/flyer? It's an intriguing design that has indeed withstood the test of time.
     
  11. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
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    It was an embedded image like the layout I did in an earlier post. My dad, brother and I have built 2 Thorps and a Pietenpol. The Piet and the latest Thorp are at a hanger outside San Diego.
     
  12. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    OK, try posting it as an attachment, which is preferable to hosting it elsewhere.

    When you click the "Reply" button, under the bottom of the text box will be an "Advanced Options" button. Click that button. On the subsequent screen, click the "Manage Attachments" button, then navigate your HDD to where you have the image stored, click on it, then click the "Upload" button.
    Very cool. :cool: Dad finished a Rans Coyote II last year; it's a beauty.

    Did you build the Pietenpol with a Model A engine, Corvair, or something else?
     
  13. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
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    The Thorp...
    [​IMG]

    Will have to find an updated pic of the Piet. It has a continental in it.


    [​IMG]
     
  14. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
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    Tried replying again, the pic I used before was at photobucket and worked fine. The others were imageshack and a seperate website and it didn't like them. Looked fine in the preview tho.
     
  15. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
    0
    The Piet has a continental.
     
  16. Pietenpol

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 27, 2008
    26
    0
    Pin-out for the machine plug.
     
  17. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    OK, hang tight. It may take awhile for the photo links to be approved.
     
  18. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    144
    Photos approved. Pietenpol, the more you post the less likely it will flag up your posts.

    Apologies for the delay.

    Dave
     
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