Books for introduction to electronics

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Fabian90, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. Fabian90

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 6, 2015
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    Hi everyone,
    I need to cover some electronic intro topics for an exam and I was wondering if any of you can recommend any decent books with good explanations and plenty of exercises to practice.
    The topics I have to cover are the following:
    - Fundamentals of electrcity.
    - Concepts of current, voltage, resisstance and Ohm's Law
    - Brief introduction to variable resistors, potential dividers and superconductors
    - DC circuit rules (calculations of potential difference and current with resistors in series and parallel and with 2 or more identical cells in series and parallel)
    - Introduction to AC circuits and how to use an oscilloscope as a dc voltmeter and ac voltmeter
    - Kirchhoff's current and voltage law
    Many thanks in advance!
     
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  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  3. Fabian90

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 6, 2015
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    Ok I will, thanks a lot for your help!
     
  4. Glenn Holland

    Member

    Dec 26, 2014
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    I'm an old fashioned tech (I'm over 60 years old) and I prefer hard copy books over on-line version.

    Therefore, my recommendation is you might want to check on Amazon.Com
     
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  5. kpcircuit

    New Member

    Jan 11, 2015
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    I suggest you to prefer online materials instead of any perticular book.... It developes your knowledge at a high extent.
     
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  6. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    One thing to be aware of is that the E-book here used so-called electron current instead of conventional current, which is what you are almost certainly using. Worse, like almost all users of electron current, the E-book does it wrong. It can still be useful, just be aware of this inconsistency.
     
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  7. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Could you please elaborate WB?
     
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  8. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Sure. According to the E-book, if you hook a 1Ω resistor across the terminals of a 12V battery, then there is a current of 12A flowing from the negative terminal of the battery to the positive terminal (through the resistor). Since 1A is 1 coulomb/second, they are therefore claiming that there is +12C/s of charge flowing from the negative terminal to the positive terminal. That's wrong. There is -12C/s of charge flowing from the negative terminal to the positive terminal, which means that their is a current of -12A flowing from the negative terminal to the positive terminal.

    That's the mistake that is all-but-universally made by the "electron current" crowd. They want to say that current flows in the direction of the electrons and they want then call that current amperes, but the ampere is not defined as the number of charge carriers per second, but rather the amount of charge per second.
     
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  9. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    URGENT MISSION
    from xkcd.com
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2015
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  10. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    In some ways it would have been nice had Ben's coin landed on tails, but if it had then what we call the negative terminal of the battery we would now call the positive and vice versa. So what? The people that use conventional flow would still use the exact same nomenclature and math. It is possible, however, that the people that now use "electron current" might, by coincidence, get things correct.
     
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  11. Fabian90

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 6, 2015
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    Thanks a lot for the help everyone!!
     
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