Books for a hobbyist

Discussion in 'General Science' started by BamaFan, Sep 2, 2016.

  1. BamaFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 2, 2016
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    It has been a long time since I studied electronics. I hold an Associate of Electronics Technology degree, 1966, but I am a little rusty. I am quite familiar with basic AC & DC theory, wiring and power, and test intruments, so i don't need a book for beginners. However, we didn't study much electromechanical theory back then as I remember. I want to learn how to design, breadboard, test, and implement circuits for controlling motors, valves, pumps, etc. for use in an automotive environment.

    Can anyone recommend any good books for me.
     
  2. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    There's probably an electronics for dummies, and one ............for the evil genius books. They're quite modern, but a bit superficial IMO.

    You'd need to elaborate a bit on where you want to go with this - the range to choose from is staggering.
     
  3. BamaFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 2, 2016
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    I have never liked the books for dummies as they seem too simplistic. I am looking for a book with some sample projects, ranging from relatively simple to complex. I know and hopefully remember enough about semiconductor theory to figure out what is happening in a circuit. As an example, I have a motorhome in which I would like to make some modifications to control air valves, motors, and timers. Thanks.
     
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  4. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    How about a google search for auto electrical and electronic systems.
    Plenty of results.
     
  5. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
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    I learnt an awful lot of my electronics from books in Darlington (UK) library, fabulous. Now there is so much information online (including books) I suspect it is close to making technical books obsolete. Google automotive control circuitry.
     
  6. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    There's tons of books on archive.org - if you know what you're looking for....................
     
  7. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  8. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Go to your public library and get a stack for a week.
     
  9. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Or, you could just tell us what you want and we will start guiding you to some search terms or guide you to a better solution.
     
  10. recklessrog

    Member

    May 23, 2013
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    Even though i have a degree and spent most of my life involved in electronics, There are two little reference books I keep with me right on the bench. They have proved invaluable over the years! Published by Bernard Babani and written by F.A.Wilson. they are:-
    1, Practical Electronics Calculations and Formulae BP53.
    2, Further Practical Electronics and Formulae BP144.
    Unfortunately now out of print, but they are often listed on Amazon for a few pounds each.
    Very well written, and not overly complex. I use them as memory joggers when the old brain has a freeze up :)
     
  11. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    If you can find a copy of Electronic Communications, by R.L. Shrader, grab it. (No, you can't have mine). Any edition of the ARRL Handbook is great, too.
     
  12. BamaFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 2, 2016
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    Thanks Guys.

    I am taking all of this advice to heart and will seriously consider all of these sources. I will also need advice on buying test equipment once I get started. For example, I will need an inexpensive standalone ammeter for in-circuit testing, but don't know where to shop for such an instrument. Amazon.com, ebay? I doubt it.

    We are traveling right now, so I won't be able to do much for a while.
     
  13. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Since you're just starting out, I wouldn't spend more then $20 on a DVM. Don't become dependent on measuring current with a meter. The meter resistance can affect readings. Measuring the voltage drop across a resistor that's already in the circuit is a better method, or insert a small resistance for that purpose.

    If you're in the US, Harbor Freight has coupons for a free DVM with any purchase. Not the best meter, but you can't really complain if it's free. I have several so I can have one in my car, one in my tool bag, etc. I use a better meter for circuits, but they'll do in a pinch.
     
  14. BamaFan

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 2, 2016
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    I have two DVMs, one a cheap HF meter, the other a nice Fluke, older version of the 323. Thanks.
     
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