Book recommendation to learn Electrical engineering (EE) from scratch.

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by Phong Phan Thanh, Jul 15, 2016.

Which book is the best for introduction to Electrical Engineering

  1. The Art of Electronics - by Paul Horowitz, Winfield Hill

    5 vote(s)
    62.5%
  2. Getting Started in Electronics - by Forrest M.Mims

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Introdution to Electronics - Bobzulinski

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Electronics_for_Dummies - by Gordon McComb, Earl Boysen

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. All About Circuits Textbook - Lessons in Electric Circuits

    3 vote(s)
    37.5%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Phong Phan Thanh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 15, 2016
    4
    0
    First of all, I know nothing about Electrical engineering, because I'm going to the university a few months from now so I start looking for book to kinda introduce me to EE and also may help me on my study at the university too.

    So i found a lot of books free online and start to get confused to choose a book to start with:

    The Art of Electronics - by Paul Horowitz, Winfield Hill
    Getting Started in Electronics - by Forrest M.Mims
    Introdution to Electronics - Bobzulinski
    Electronics_for_Dummies - by Gordon McComb, Earl Boysen
    All about circuits's text book

    I now those book (if not all of them) are really good, so can you guys give me some advice? Like start with which book first, then move on to which one?

    Thank you.
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,137
    1,786
    MY best advice is to do all of them in any order and repeat as necessary. It will be 18-24 months before you see an actual EE course if your university is at all similar to the one I went to.
     
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  3. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
    3,869
    1,393
    Of the ones you listed, the Forrest Mims book is the most elementary. It will allow you to build some simple circuits and see how some components work together, but there is not much theory. Many people start with it.
    The most comprehensive of the books you listed is The Art of Electronics; it is good, but it is expensive.
    And of course the All About Circuits book is free on this web site; a pretty good mix of theory and practical circuits.

    A lot depends on your aptitude.
     
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  4. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
    4,413
    782
    Hover your cursor over "Education" on the info bar at the top of this page. The books are pretty basic to start off with - you should make short work of them if they're too simple.
     
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  5. Phong Phan Thanh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 15, 2016
    4
    0
    Thank you very much for your answers

    I'm going to the Vietnamese - Germany University (VGU), so what exactly will the university teach me in the first 1-2 years?
    Or . . . what exactly did the university teach you in the first 1-2 years? (I'm just a little bit curious :))

    I have also seen a lot of recommendation to use this book as the first book, but there is a opinion from endolith in this topic about the book, saying that there are some information that may lead to miss understanding :( :
    http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/616/basic-electronics-book/618#618

    I founded tons of recommendations about this book, some even described it as the Bible of Electronics.

    Also on that link there are lots of replies say that The Art of Electronics is a bit out of date in some sections, and it is also a bit too heavy for a beginner. So can you guys give me some advice on this? :(

    I somehow found the 3rd edition of The Art of Electronics free online ;) , so between the 2nd and the 3rd edition, are they the same or which one is better?
     
  6. OBW0549

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 2, 2015
    1,308
    884
    The material on microcontrollers in the 2nd edition was out of date even when the book was first published, and I found that section essentially useless. That section in the 3rd edition, however, is pretty good.

    In my opinion, the 3rd edition is much, MUCH better.
     
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  7. Phong Phan Thanh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 15, 2016
    4
    0
    Thank you for your answer! How do you think about this book? Is it good for a beginner, or I may need to already know the basics to fully understand the book and use it effectively?
     
  8. OBW0549

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 2, 2015
    1,308
    884
    I think for a beginner, TAoE will be a bit of a challenge; though the first section, Foundations, gives a pretty good introduction especially if you supplement it with the educational material here on AAC and elsewhere on the Internet. I recommend it.
     
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  9. Phong Phan Thanh

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 15, 2016
    4
    0
    Thank you! I think I know how to start learning Electrical Engineering now :)
     
  10. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,137
    1,786
    In my first two years at the University of Michigan I had Calculus, Differential Equations, Statics, Dynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Strength of Materials, Physics, Chemistry, and Metallurgy. Those were the core courses for all of the Engineering programs. I was in my third year before I took my first circuits class.
     
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  11. BelleFixer

    New Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    8
    3
    Hi, electrical engineering has a wide range of applications these days and it could have been subdivided. Anyway, most engineering subjects is more about concepts and one of the books that my uncle recommends for a beginner is the one written by VK Mehta. It is the "Basic Electrical Technology" I hope that helps.
     
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  12. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
    4,413
    782
    If you're stating from scratch - that might be a bit dry reading. Which edition is the least of your worries.

    The Forrest Mims books are a good introduction. Robert Penfold may have a few books in print - he has a regular column in EPE magazine.
     
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