bomb detector project help?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by victorment, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
    0
    Is there a potassium nitrate sensor? I would use it to our bomb detector project for our design. Thanks in advance
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    The simple answer is that detection of nitrates is quite easy. Detecting potassium nitrate per se would be more difficult.

    Do yo want an electronic or colorimetric sensor? What level of sensitivity do you want? Do you want a one-time sensor or a monitoring (i.e., continuous) sensor?

    John
     
  3. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    I played with potassium nitrate and other chemicals that go BOOM when I was a kid.
    One chemical mixture with iodine blew up all by itself. I am lucky I survived.
    Most of my rockets blew up and some of my bombs went up like missles.
     
  4. wenn32

    Member

    Nov 9, 2010
    37
    0
    Cool childhood :)
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
    A lot of us went through that phase. I messed with the iodine solution when I was in college, but Estes Rockets gave me my missile fix young. Some of the things I did don't bear repeating, and if my Dad had twigged I think my butt would be a bit smaller today.
     
  6. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
    896
    My dad asked me about the holes I blasted in the back yard. I blamed meteorites.
     
  7. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,018
    1,537
    I spilled the iodine mix in my bedroom (summer time) for days after when the wind would blow in through the window there would be a 'crackling' sound. At night the crackling sound and very small 'sparkles' from it going off. Got the formula from a book in my junior high school library. Ah the good old days :)
     
  8. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
    0
    I want an electronic device that monitor potassium nitrate in bags. It is like walk in door bomb detector. Can you help me?
     
  9. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    If you would respond to my questions in post #2, I might be able to give some advice.

    Now it seems you want to "monitor." Earlier, it seemed you just wanted to "detect." Which is it? Do you need a quantitative result? What are you allowed to put into the bags in order to accomplish your task?

    In other words, please describe what you want to do in sufficient detail so that if someone were asking you for help to do it, you might be able to help.

    John
     
  10. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
    8,754
    760
    I always wonder how u detect explosive devices.
     
  11. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
    8,754
    760
    Thanks..that was a good laugh....:D

    U know, if we blow up anything just for education, you'll be locked up for days.
     
  12. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
    0
    I want to detect it. Our project is a baggage scanner that detects a bomb and alarm if detection happens and simultaneously sends an SMS to the bomb squad. Ive seen a detector evd-2500 but its too expensive.
     
  13. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
    300
    Let us hope that someone is not hoping to check how well some real bombs have been sealed up. I feel uneasy about this.
     
  14. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
    5,699
    907
    So it's a school project and you need only to detect nitrates, right? Would a wipe that changed color or fluoresced and was then read electronically suffice? That is/was what was used in the US and is very sensitive. The chemistry for the wipe is also simple.

    If you need selective ion detection, there are ways to do that, but they can get expensive. One approach is to use an immobilized enzyme on a pH or redox electrode. You pick the right enzyme to cause a pH change or redox change and use that as your signal.

    You can also use whole microorganisms, e.g, E. coli or any Enterobacteriaceae to reduce nitrate to nitrite, then detect nitrite.

    In other words, there are lots of ways to do it. Since it appears to be a school project, what have you learned from your reading so far? What general type of approach appeals to you, considering the resources and time that you have available?

    If you need to detect potassium nitrate per se, I suspect that would be considerably more complicated.

    John

    BTW, the evd-2500 does not include a claim for detecting potassium nitrate. It's good you didn't buy it.
    http://www.highcomsecurity.com/eod--explosive-ordinance-detection/detection/evd-2500.html
     
Loading...