board does not power up

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by mlov83, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    hello i have been working with this relay board(forgive my wrong terminology) the vendor calls it K180V3. ROLLING CODE 4-CHANNEL UHF REMOTE CONTROL with RESET ON EACH CHANNEL. I have solder everything and i cant get anything to work. I have trying adding the 12v of power that it requires and nothing seems to come on. here are the specs for the board. http://www.electronickits.com/kit/complete/elec/ck1616v3.pdf
    i have also tried to contact the manufactured for help but its been 1 day and i haven't heard anything from them. How can i go about troubleshooting what i did wrong? I have tested that I'm getting 12v to the board but that's about the extend of my knowledge with the meter what else should i test for voltage? Any help on trying to solve my problem would be most appreciated.
    Thanks
    Miguel
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2013
  2. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    I would start by trimming those leads that are sticking out and, most likely, touching someplace they shouldn't...:eek:

    Also, the jumpers may need to be present...
     
  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    then trim those nails :p:D:eek::D
     
  4. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Lol! I was just thinking the same thing. Do you guys think trimming the leads could really make that much of difference? I'm going to so that as soon as I get back home. Just didn't think that could be the issue.
     
  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Its hard to tell by the pictures but it "seems" like some of the leads are touching other "blobs" of solder they shouldn't be or leads bridged to other leads,etc...
    and go back and reflow most of those joints too.. it looks horrible.. no offense
     
  6. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    No offense taken I'm totally new to this I'm a programmer by trade and I'm learning how to do this on my own. Thanks for the reply I know I suck but I'm just starting bud.
     
  7. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Trim all the leads so that nothing is touching. But still no power any other ideas on what I could or should try?
     
  8. gnuuser

    New Member

    Jan 17, 2013
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    exactly trim all the leads and you need to practice soldering a bit as i also see way to much solder. this is usually caused by going too fast.
    when soldering a joint take your time and clean the tip of your iron frequently
    carefully review the manual as well
     
  9. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    Here is an image showing the KitsRUs image versus yours. I would suggest looking over the area indicated in red and ensuring no shorts with a multimeter.

    Also check that your electrolytic capacitor is in with the correct polarity.
     
  10. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
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    Keep in mind that you may have already damaged some parts when attempting to power it the first time, via some unintentional shorts.
     
  11. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Thanks guys. I'm hopelessly confused and frustrated. I'll ask yet another dumb question what's the big problem with solder blobs. I have gotten a couple of criticism about that? I have started to read this http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_1/1.html
    However I'm not sure I need to read all of this before I can get this miniature project completed. All I was trying to do is get a little sound board, program some wording into it and control it with a remote. Perhaps this time I bit more then I can chew. I love to hear any other suggestions on how to accomplish my goal since I have probably damaged this $85 dollar kit. Ouch :(
     
  12. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    The problem is that with small components, you may bridge pins/buses, which could damage your device. It is very easy to inadvertently bridge two pins that were supposed to be isolated.
     
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  13. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    ...also, be advised, the polarity of your power supply into the board is wrong...

    If you still have problems, take some close up pictures of the board at the location circled and the base of the voltage regulator...
     
  14. mlov83

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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    Thanks for the information. I will take much close pics and post them up tonight. I didn't realize i should have been watching for polarity, as well now i feel like a real a$$.:rolleyes:

    When you said that the power supply its incorrect in polarity how do you know that? I did everything as it appears in the picture... I think.
    Thanks so much for the helpful remarks. I truly appreciated. I feel worst then the first time i picked up a programming book. :(
     
  15. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    No worries, this hobby takes time and dedication - the more you fail, the more you learn.

    From the power supply, there are two wires. The one with the stripe is generally the positive supply, where the other (solid black) is "ground". When viewing the two side-by-side, you can just read the silk screen where it labels "GND" and the other looks like "+12V"...
     
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