Big and small - Old and new

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by atferrari, May 14, 2007.

  1. atferrari

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    I bought the small one some 33 years ago. A true Casio Micromini. It has no memory.

    The bigger one, I bought it, two weeks ago. No memory either. It just makes a good piece of conversation...and simple calulations:(
     
  2. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
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    and i thought we were aiming at nano-technology.
    what advantage does the big one provide,
    even my casio 991 fx seems better.

    is it a palm top, is it a laptop, ...
    its a calculator :( !
     
  3. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    There is no chance of "fat-fingers" with that one!

    That reminds me of my first mobile phone - except that it was twice as fat!

    Dave
     
  4. atferrari

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    In fact, I do all the calculations related to my job or my hobby, with my 20 yo Casio fx-991s (paid for it, in Japan, 50 USD), which is limited to 9 digits in binary and doesn't go too far in hexadecimal.

    Recently I posted somewhere else in this forum about two binary division algoritms implemented for PICs of the 18F family.

    All calculations needed up to the verifications were done with the calculator coming with Windows. What I didn't like is to be stuck to the screen to keep it in sight while trying to write in my notebook. Doing that for long time is far from comfortable.

    But it worked!
     
  5. BladeSabre

    Senior Member

    Aug 11, 2005
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    I've been doing my recent hexadecimal calculations on the Windows calculator too, which is not much fun. But I just now remembered where I put my battered old Sharp EL-546L which can do up to 10 hex digits.

    A few years back I mentioned my quest for such an item to my computing teacher at school, who revealed that he had collected quite a number of abandoned calculators, most of which didn't seem to be working- he let me take the two that had hexadecimal on them, and one was really broken, but the other just needed a new battery. I'm comparing it now to my other calculators, and I don't think I realised before just how good it is...
     
  6. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    That's actually one of the few uses of the Windows Calculator!

    I found that the Windows Powertoy Calculator is pretty useful, and is a recommended download from MS's website for any budding engineer. I have found one bug in it when I programme the function g(x)=sin(x*pi)

    One of MS's useful applications and for free.

    Dave
     
  7. mOOse

    Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    20
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    It seems to only show about 6 periods/wavelengths of trig equations.
    I don't know if that's a bug or a "feature".
     
  8. Gadget

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 10, 2006
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    That big machine looks like the one I got my boss the other day. It's the same footprint as an A4 sheet of paper (a bit bigger than letterhead for our US viewers).
    He makes a point of using it whenever his clients come in. He can almost see it without glasses.
     
  9. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    Clearly it's a feature! :rolleyes:

    I find it useful for basic plotting of functions, but it I want a more rigorous investigation of the function I'm afraid only Matlab (or one of it's clones) will do.

    Dave
     
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