Battery Bulging

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by R!f@@, Jan 6, 2011.

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  1. R!f@@

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    [​IMG]

    See the Pic. I store those two carefully when I moved and of course I did charge them.
    Last night as I was going via the stuff I saw on 'em above to pop :eek:.
    Lucky I saw it before it went BOOOOM!!

    The Bulgy one is dead, the other one measures 3.3V but is kind spongy. I can somewhat squeeze it, Is this normal of Li-on's

    Is it safe to POP the bulging one. :D I thought of cutting it open but thought I'd post here and see if there any dangerous chemicals or am I going to nuke my house. ...

    Waiting for a reply.......hammer in my hand.
     
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  2. tyblu

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    Nov 29, 2010
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    I don't think the LiOn will do much more than blow toxins on you, but a LiPo will explode (oxidize).
     
  3. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Yoku makes a lot of Li-polymer batteries and that bulging pack certainly looks like a LiPo pack. Couldn't find a picture of its Li-ion line. As tyblu said, if its LiPo be very careful. I would definitely not mess with it indoors.

    John
     
  4. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Get that out of your home!

    This is the reason for using a charge box.

    If that were to go, it will pump out some serious thick, toxic smoke, and burn VERY hot.
     
  5. R!f@@

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    It's out retched ....no worries.

    But haven't disposed it.If I threw it some trash collector or kid will do what I was thinking.
    We do not have such disposable possibility.
    What are my options. Can't throw it out to sea, can't throw it the dustbin.

    Need a safe disposable method.

    By the way..is the other spongy Lipo OK to keep. It has charge. But the sponginess is the problem, as before it wasn't that like tht.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2011
  6. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    Why can't you throw it in the ocean? It produces lithium ion, chloride, and sulfate after reaction with water. Some guys around here use them for target practice, then bury them afterward. The main danger is the rapid thermal reaction when the lithium is oxidized.

    John
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Target practice sounds good, or you could wait until it goes to sleep in its coffin and stab it in the heart with a wooden stake.

    or, you could bury it a foot deep in sand and stab it with a steel rod...anything to disarm it where it can't hurt anyone!
     
  8. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
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    Bulging is the result of storing the LiPo battery fully charged or fully discharged.

    For a prolonged storage of months, its best to store them with only 30~50% charge.

    Those comments are all from the internet so believe it or not, its your call.
     
  9. Von

    Active Member

    Oct 29, 2008
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    Agreed eblc...,
    ...LiPo's prefer to be stored at about 3.8 Vdc/cell.

    Putting a LiPo in the sea is an analog to putting it into a brine solution which allows a slow discharge to zero potential.

    Slowly bringing it down to 0.0 Vdc will render it inert.
     
  10. marshallf3

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    Jul 26, 2010
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    Don't know about around there but here the battery places and even hardware stores have recycle drop off bins. I raid them on occasion as often a NiCd or Ni/MH drill battery will go bad due to one dead cell and after you open it you find the rest are still fine.
     
  11. marshallf3

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    Jul 26, 2010
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    It's true, I don't charge my Li-Ion packs until they start to show a noticeable amount of discharge then expect to use them in short order after I've charged them back up. If I recall 70% is the best charge to maintain them at and the cooler they are the better. In other words don't try and get those last minutes out of one and try not to fully charge it until you're ready to use it.

    This method has returned me a far increased life in exchange.
     
  12. tyblu

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    Nov 29, 2010
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    I would probably do something horrible to it, likely involving mains voltage and an extension cord.
     
  13. R!f@@

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    If I connect mains voltage to it, what would be the worst possible out come.

    Got to find me a tripod to mount the camera before I do anything of the sort.

    Why is it that all of you tend to answer half of the post. I find this every more often that always one or two questions are left behind.

    I need to know if the other Lipo on it's way to POP. Is the softness I found in it normal or Should I nuke it too.

    One more thing, How do I know the difference between a Li-po and Li-ion. Lipo's are mostly flat, right?
    while Li-on's are round and has the same size I find as in lap top batteries.
     
  14. R!f@@

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    The cells say 3.7V. If I were to store them at 3.8V, how is it possible that it will be like you said at half the nominal voltage.

    Are they at 4.2V when fully charged.
    If so then what is the 3.7V rating...is it the nominal cell voltage at 3 Amps.
     
  15. marshallf3

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    Jul 26, 2010
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    Li-POs are far newer technology thus application specific, just as Li-Ions have remained to be.

    The potential dangers involved with these batteries make any vendor very cautious about selling them.

    Mains voltage to a 3V battery? You can't be serious? These aren't like the old NiCds we could often zap an internal short from with a cap that had a few hundred volt charge on it.
     
  16. marshallf3

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    Jul 26, 2010
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    Why is it that all of you tend to answer half of the post.

    Probably because we don't know all the answers, we just chip in as we can.
    I post a lot of incorrect replies (which I'm usually corrected on in time) and try my best not to give out misleading data.
     
  17. R!f@@

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    Ya but...the guys here mostly have all the answers. I know this from there answers they are well informed in the related subject.
    Still I see sum questions left unanswered. :(

    Any one can provide wrong data, that is why we have lotta guys..to tell us if we are wrong. It's not a problem.
     
  18. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    That's insulting. First, it's an exaggeration. Second, you identified the batteries as Li-ion in your post:

    Perhaps some of us believed it was important to ascertain what type of battery you had before giving specific advice. That was certainly the case for me. I bothered looking up the manufacturer to see if it also made Li-ion batteries, and apparently it does. Now, had we restricted our advice to LiPo's and the batteries were in fact Li-ion, I suspect you would have accused us of never answering your questions. You should have done the legwork to identify the batteries before asking the question, or you should have asked what type of batteries they were, if you did not know.

    Finally, the skin on a new LiPo will usually be quite tight. Most of my experience is with batteries of at least 1000 mAH. However, some will get a little gassy with use and still be usable. I am quite conservative and throw mine out when they show any puffiness; some others in our club continue to use them until they are puffed almost as bad as your first example.

    Now that you you think your batteries are LiPo's, yes, the other is on its way to puffing. In my early days of using LiPo's, my first battery puffed a little (I was pulling too much current), it got better after a few days standing, so I charged it. On the next flight , if puffed more. I discarded it at that point. And no, puffiness is not "normal." As mentioned above, I have seen experienced modelers continues to use batteries that are a little puffed. I have also noticed that some of the very small cells, say 110 mAH, that come with inexpensive toys tend to be a bit softer from the get go.

    You look at them and read the labels. That's the basis by which most of us assumed your batteries were LiPo's, not Li-ion. Yes, LiPo's are usually flat like the ones you show. NB, batteries are being made in many different shapes today compared to the older, cylindrical NiMH and NICd batteries. If you don't know what you are dealing with, get someone to help you who does or do some reading about it before you dig in.

    John
     
  19. R!f@@

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    Sheeeesh!! U nailed me this time good. U sure do no how to embarrass me.
    Sorry John. Never meant to insult anyone. :p

    And I thought it was Li-on's. Once you said Lipo, I stick with that.
    But now you sometimes say it is li-on and sometimes Lipo's

    And I missed the Yoku part before. I was too concerned about the bulge. So I posted it and then stored them outside.

    Final conclusion

    I should pop them both and throw it to sea.
    Or just throw it to sea.
    Or bury it, :confused:. Problem ...dunno where....every where people are building places.
    So sea is the only way.
     
  20. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Blow it up (overcharge, overvoltage or short circuit), just make sure you are a distance away behind some protection.

    Once a cell drops below 3V it's dead. 3.3V and you might be able to rescue it.

    Those thin, non-cylindrical cells seem to make it clear that it is LiPo, LiIon are not easily made into that shape.
     
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