Batteries used in microprocessor

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by redfrost, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. redfrost

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2013
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    Hi, I recently read about the future use of paper batteries to power microprocessors. Does anyone know if there are currently any batteries used to power microprocessors? Haven't been able find answers online.

    Thanks for your help. :)
     
  2. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    uC's need 2.5 to 5V at a few milliamps to 25mA.

    AA or AAA batteries, even coin cells can power them, depending on function.

    If the intent is to light LEDs or run a motor, battery life is greatly shortened.

    Right now the highest power in a package is Lithium based. Either Lithium Ion rechargeable, or Standard Lithium (Coin Cells to CR123).

    There are new technologies in R&D for thinner/high capacity, but none are on the market yet. Battery R&D is ALWAYS improving, since society as we know it is entirely dependent upon them. In the past 20 years, mobile phones have dropped from a few pounds to a few ounces, for example.

    I don't know of any technologies based on paper, though I'd imagine some form of lithium/paper/electrolyte/electrode combination can be paper thin and very low capacity, and in development.

    In the meantime, super fast charging capacitors are a viable power source if intermediate power is accessed (Solar or grid).
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Every cell phone, tablet, and laptop, to name a few, has one.
     
  4. redfrost

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2013
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    Thanks thatoneguy! Just to check my understanding. AA, AAA and capacitors are all possible power sources for a microcontroller, depending on what the uC is used for?

    Since microprocessor is a different thing, does it still use the same batteries? And for those microprocessors used in devices with a an "external" power supply, such as computers (AC power) and mobile phones (Li-ion battery), does the microprocessor still need a battery embedded in it for it's own power source?
     
  5. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    I am getting pretty good results with coin cells, circuits work some days even with 7seg displays.

    you should use a lower frequency, for instace 650 KHz etc.

    Using 8 MHz will draw some mA on it's own.

    Lithium CR123 is very compact. Also single cell AA is available now, some Atmel chips can use them directly, Microchip has released a dc/dc chip, the MCP1640 which is a SOT23 case with 6 pins. Not so easy to solder but possible.

    I get about 2 weeks runtime from a single AA cell and a small LED matrix.
     
  6. redfrost

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2013
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    sorry another question. After looking for paper batteries online, I found several terms used which confuses me. What are the differences between printed/thin batteries and paper batteries?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  7. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    What, exactly, are you looking for?

    There may have been press releases stating in very much layman's terms how the battery is constructed, this doesn't mean ONLY paper is used in the battery, but more of a "stable mounting spot" for the actual battery to be assembled on.

    Are you attempting to make a battery out of paper?
     
  8. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    No, many microprocessors run in cars to control seats and mirror positions, as well as airbags. More are in your USB keyboard and mouse. MP3 players have a microcontroller + LCD driver + CODEC ASIC, as well as an audio amplifier, which can run from any power source capable of providing enough current at the needed voltage.

    Many are line powered, such as in Microwaves and in ovens and dryers.

    Microcontrollers are in about everything these days, as well as complete "System on Chip" microprocessors, such as the heart of Smart Phones.

    Nearly all of the devices have power management built in, such as battery monitoring/charging circuitry, buck/boost power supplies to get the right voltage needed from a lower or higher voltage, etc.

    The question is extremely open ended, as the type of microcontroller or microprocessor isn't defined, nor it's function, and neither is the output, so the answer is "most any supply available".
     
  9. redfrost

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 26, 2013
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    I'm currently doing a project on paper batteries and its applications. Companies producing paper batteries such as Rocket Batteries, Vendum Batteries and Paper Batter Co have different paper battery technologies. So I'm trying to understand if there is a proper standard defining what exactly a paper battery is supposed to constitute? Is it supposed to only contain carbon nanotubes and paper (or other cellulose-based materials) and no other metals?

    Thanks for your help. I apologize for my lack of understanding and appreciate your patience in explaining things :)
     
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