Bath room tiles drywall ?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Mathematics!, Feb 16, 2010.

  1. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
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    I have been getting ready to refinish the tub but I also am going to replace all the bathroom tub tiles....

    I finally took all the tiles down and now I am wondering once I decide on what tiles I want to put up... I am curious it looks as if the dry wall where the tiles where was covered in layers of brown construction paper .

    At present this construction paper is crusted with old white tile adhesive,...etc.

    I am wondering when I start laying new tile do I tear off the paper and put new paper up or do I use the existing paper with all the crap on it???

    Their is some spots where the paper was ripped what do I do for this?

    Thanks for any help hopefully I don't have to cut out the whole dry wall and replace it with new dry wall?

    Also the dry wall for the tiles looks a little different looking then the normal dry wall I paint over... maybe this is just because of the paper or is their more to it then that some kind of water proofing agent????

    Thanks for any input
     
  2. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    The brown paper is your sheetrock I wouldn't
    destory it.
     
  3. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
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    So is it just drywall then sheetrock or is their more layers to this type of wall?

    Also if some sheetrock is destroyed is their away of replacing it?
    For instance when taking down the tiles some of the sheetrock peeled off with it....
     
  4. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    The new way they do it on your buck,is to rip it
    all out. And start over.
     
  5. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
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    So by rip it all out.
    You mean cut the dry wall out completely and lay new dry wall over the studs?

    The new way...
    Is their anything less drastic then ripping it out completely to repair it?
    Like an Old way???
     
  6. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Watch any remodeling anywhere in your area or this old house,
    the sunday night program. A contractor won't touch a job
    with out control,once you sign that contract you could lose
    your house from costs to save it from the contractor.
    Contractors are very powerful with lien powers,a contract
    is one of the most binding.
     
  7. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    In Fla. a super rich business man sue his contractor,the business mans
    wife was so mad when ask to put up $50,000,000 to collect judgement
    they put the money in the hands of a scams attorney.The scamer was
    caught,but the $50 million was gone.The scamer went to jail but that don't
    help get money,on going story. The contractor sit on the side lines maybe
    with his lien. Contractor are needed,but the power they have is to much.
    Anyone have a good answer about the power.Good hard to prove insurance
    is out there,but that much insurance most people can't afford.
     
  8. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
    1,584
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    Another woman had a u-tube video of her roof after having it replaced
    you could see the roof was put over rotten plywood. She displayed the letters
    and audio going the city inspector no help,the state contractor code enforce
    ment. She got the run around from every one.She had the help of the press
    on her side.Contractors hold tight because of there history of winning with all
    type of contracts,home owner,government,schools,public buildings. There
    best thing they have is the little verbal add on that increase contract by
    thousands,that you thought were free or cheap,they love them.The wording
    about delays will drive you crazy,a 6 month contract can turn into 2 to 5 years.
     
  9. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    A contractors life not so easy,it must be alfull to have to take
    a sub-contract because of slow down.if they have a good crew
    they can't afford to let them get set-up some where else. Also
    not being able to be bonded for some jobs.So you have the small
    fish,shark effect with in the contractor food chains. So that puts a lot
    of money going to the insurance Industry. So all the add on cost to put
    a building toether. So you get the lobbies in the middle to put the deal
    together more cost. So follow the money that each gets,not so easy,
    that makes this a difficult process to follow. We did not mention the
    bankers share.Help me understand why we should not join Thingmaker
    in the forest to find a home stead.How many of you guys could take the
    woods over this terrible economy. Every one dreams of the cabin in the
    mountains,could you take the cabin and forget about the home that you
    pay more fees than you ever make,with interest rates that you will never
    over come,and all the surprises that are coming your way.
     
  10. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
    795
    388
    My buddies a master tile layer. One of his big issues is the plumbers used to install the tubs and toilets. If they don't get it exactly right you will have gaps and crappy tile. Many times he tells me of having to go in there and fix everything before he can even start working. So moral of the story is before you start laying tile make sure all your ammenities are straight and level. 1 mm can make a huge difference in tile.
     
  11. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Trouble in River City,an old phase.So he has to charge for that adding to the owner
    expense,covered in the contract some where.
     
  12. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    If you want a professional result, and no mold, remove the old dry wall. If you have a brown 'construction' paper covering on your drywall, it is most likely because the original installers didn't use the proper water resistant drywall. They instead used a vapor barrier paper on top of regular grade drywall.

    Remove the old drywall and replace with a duroc type cement board. They come in 3x5 foot panels. It is basically concrete sandwitched between two pieces of netting.

    It will not warp, or provide any cellulose for mold. It also has a great texture for holding thin-set and tiles. Highly reccomended. You can find thick versions for sub flooring and thinner versions for wallboard. You can screw, or nail it into place with standard hardware. It will also allow you to skip the drywall steps of taping and spackleing, and painting.

    here is a link to help:
    http://www.homeadditionplus.com/Installing%20Ceramic%20Tile%20in%20a%20Shower.htm
     
  13. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
    2,907
    2,164

    Great advice. I remodeled a bath a few years ago and used hardibacker board to lay tile. It's great stuff.
    Some pictures of ripout and reinstall of new tub and tile. That old stuff was nasty.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nsaspook/sets/72157623339803643/show/

    Checkout this site for the best methods. http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/index.php
     
  14. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
    4
    Ok ,I am just going to install the standard water resistant drywall around the tub.

    Putting up the dry wall is pretty easy until I got to the last wall where the tub fauct , handles ,...etc poke out.

    I don't know how to hang this piece since I don't want to cut it into 2 seperate pieces since their are only 2 studs to nail it to.

    I know they must have cut it some way and slipped it on but I forget what the old one was like. Any advice would be great.

    I am think cut the top of the dry wall just enough to slide the dry wall over the shower pipe and cut a small hole for the turn on knob...etc Or maybe use tape and putty and just cut it into to halfs.
     
  15. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    measure from the wall and use plunge cuts to open the holes for the faucet and knobs. A friend of mine with one hand uses a technique of taping a sharpie marker to the things he wants to cut around. When he holds the drywall up to the wall, the markers draw dots where the Items are. He then measures up, down, left, and right from the marker and spot to cut the holes.
     
  16. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
    4
    cool , gotcha

    what would he or someone use to cut /shape the tiles around the tub fixtures that sit on top of the shaped dry wall?

    I am thinking some type of saw?
    The only thing I currently have is a dremel and the extension for cutting dry wall and wood. Though I am wondering if this dremel 300 with the special dremel MS400 XPR MultiSaw will also cut/shape tiles.

    I am trying to play it as cheap as possible to do this project.
    Thanks for your thoughts that marker idea was a really good thought.
     
  17. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
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    A diamond bladed tile saw. Rent one from home depot..Also called a wet saw. It cycles water onto the tile to cool while being cut. You usually cut the tiles bigger then overlay a chrome(or any) fixture to hide the cut tiles.

    [​IMG]

    You can get hole saws and drillbits that will cut tile. I have used a jig-saw that had a tile cutting blade..not easy to use without a very fast saw.
     
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