Basics of Electricity-1970's lessons

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by ISB123, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. ISB123

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    Hello, while I was browsing YouTube I stumbled upon some vintage videos about basics of electricity and thought it should be nice from me that I share them around since they don't have much views and explain stuff pretty clearly,videos were made by USAF and they cover Ohm's law.


    The person that uploaded those videos has more videos about electronics,mostly vintage videos way back from 1920s to 1980s.
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAA9B0175C3E15B47

    Voltage:

    Current:

    Resistance:
     
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  2. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    While I suppose we should be content that the instructor got (electron) flow 'direction' right -- I daresay the phenomenon of conduction is just a tad more complex than that!:p

    Great stuff!:D -- Vintage instructional material is always a fun watch:):):)

    Best regards
    HP
     
  3. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 1, 2015
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    But it gets better (Re: the second video)! --- As per the 'Sarge'; Seems the holes in the paper were created by mere ballistic action of electrons!?:confused::eek: --- Priceless!:D:D:D

    @ISB123 -- If multiple likes per post, per user were possible you've have 100 from me alone!:):):) --- Thus I have escaped the ennui of an otherwise deadly-dull Tuesday afternoon!:cool:

    Sincere kudos!
    HP:)
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2015
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Is there any danger this is going to supersede my, "Ohm's Law for Noobies" dissertation? :D
    Just kidding. There are so many ways to explain the most simple basics, and different people respond to different approaches. Some find my fanciful explanation to be effective, some will find the "military" method effective.
    Personally, I marvel at the many methods I had to experience in order to accumulate a working theory and effective methods to understand the ways electronics work...and I'm still not finished!
     
  5. ISB123

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    This one is about transformers,explains stuff really nice and is well illustrated.
     
  6. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    well you need to do electrical stuff with some discipline. Even when you do a sloppy temporary or private wiring, keep it reasonable. Do it properly if you can and it makes sense.
     
  7. Sinus23

    Member

    Sep 7, 2013
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    Here is one that I see isn't on the playlist. It has been posted here before and I found it to be pretty cool (starts at 1:15)

    Similiarities of Wave Behavior 1959 Bell labs

     
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  8. Hypatia's Protege

    Distinguished Member

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    Very nice!:) --- It is truly refreshing to see presentations (such as this) wherein intellect and genuine curosity is assumed of the viewer!:cool:

    FWIW I feel a similar treatment of solitons would make an excellent 'sequel'!:)

    Best regards
    HP
     
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  9. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    Except that in a vacuum tube, conduction is VERY straightforward. :)
     
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  10. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
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    I must have missed something in 50+years of electronics... What the hell is a soliton? Is it like a Radiotron?

    Ps: I was trying to make fun of what I thought was a typo, but a soliton exists.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2015
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  11. Hypatia's Protege

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    For the benefit of interested parties:

    Here's a pleasingly quantitative treatment of the subject!:)
    http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Soliton

    And yes! Electrical and electromagnetic analogs are both manifest and of importance in engineering (optical wave-guides [a.k.a. fiber-optics] being a notable example...)

    Best regards
    HP:)
     
  12. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    Soliton like waves have been used in advanced radar for years. It's typically not called that in the RF spectrum (chirping is a common term) but the non-linear (using strontium and barium/strontium nonlinear or other materials lumped element transmission lines) networks has been used to compress normal spectrum RF CW pulses into compressed pulses for now primitive Doppler radar systems since the 1960's and with directed energy systems and ultra-wide band radars starting in the 1980's.
     
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  13. ISB123

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    Just stumbled on this video.

    Obviously LTSpice works better than on my computer.
     
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