Basic NPN transistor questions

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by JackD2, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. JackD2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2012
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    I've just had my first lecture on transistors and we have been asked a couple of questions to see if we understand the basics. However, I'm not confident even with these.

    1) For an NPN transistor without any external voltage, what is the electric field direction within the B-E and B-C junctions?

    My understanding is that the electric field directions are from E to B and from C to B.

    2) For an NPN transistor without any external voltage, what is the diffusion current direction within the B-E and B-C junctions?

    My understanding is that the diffusion current was from E to B and then from B to C.

    Are either or both of these correct?
     
  2. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Without external voltage applied, there isn't current flowing. The CB and BE junctions forma depletion region where the free N dopants fill in some adjacent holes. I believe to get current to flow you will need to apply voltage.
     
  3. JackD2

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 15, 2012
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    Thanks for your reply. It makes sense that there wouldn't be any overall current flow.

    I might be wrong but I think the question is asking what the electric field and diffusion current directions are, regardless of the fact that the various currents enter equilibrium, leading to no net current flow.
     
  4. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    What is "diffusion" current?
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Modern schools make us old-timers look stupid!
     
  6. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Carriers do diffuse into the adjacent regions which is what form the depletion zone..... but it establishes an equilibrium. I never heard of any "diffusion current" since there is no path for continuous current flow other than out the transistor leads.
     
  7. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Or maybe they just find complicated new labels for simple old concepts.
     
    #12 likes this.
  8. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
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    More likely!:D
     
  9. bretm

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    Feb 6, 2012
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    With no applied voltage, diffusion is short-lived before equilibrium occurs. But it is charges that are moving, so technically that's current. With an applied voltage the diffusion is continuous so it makes more sense to call it a current then.
     
  10. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    I think modern teachers are stupid.
    My old teachers did not talk about "electric field directions'" nor "diffusions".
     
  11. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Diffusion of mobility carriers is discussed in solid-state physics.
    You don't need this to understand circuit design.
     
  12. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Transistor theory:

    http://www.tpub.com/neets/book7/25a.htm
     
  13. Austin Clark

    Member

    Dec 28, 2011
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    You know me, I'm all for learning about that sort of thing, but I agree. This really shouldn't be taught in a class about electronics design. Maybe touched on, or just thrown in for fun, but not part of the curriculum. Not that it isn't important, but there are many things that should take priority over this.

    Unless, of course, the OP isn't in a design class.
     
  14. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    But aren't 'holes' being used as current carriers in some courses?

    So asking about direction of diffusion current without recourse to which type of current, be it free electron, or intrinsic hole movement.

    Kermit says to answer 'both directions' unless the question can be more specific.

    (Take that! New math. Pfft!)

    :)
     
  15. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    I have designed hundreds or thousands of circuits in my career but I have never built a transistor or IC.
    I understand how a transistor circuit or an IC circuit works, mainly from the spec's in the datasheets.

    I have never thought about which way conventional or electron current flows. I simply think that the emitter of an NPN transistor is N so it must connect to negative and the emitter of a PNP transistor is P so it must connect positive.

    I simply think that a diode conducts when its anode is positive and its cathode is negative.
     
  16. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Yes, I recall an upper division class absurdly titled "Basic Electronics" that went into all that and the functions inside the variuos types of semiconductor devices. That class was a bugger.
     
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