AVR or Arduino or PICAXE

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by mikelynch, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. mikelynch

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 30, 2007
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    Well I'll ask though I suspect its not that simple, may be like asking should I buy an Audi or a BMW or a Mercedes.

    So what would you recommend anyway:) Picaxe or AVR or Arduino !

    I have VB,C# experience and I think the Arduino would be a little harder to program as I think its the only one not programmable with BASIC.

    Other than that how do I judge these three and decide, they are all easy to acquire.

    How easily can I connect components like XBee, 433UHF Chips,keypads, displays, sensors, RFID ?

    What are any advantages or disadvantages ?

    Thanks.........
     
  2. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
    1,758
    98
    Swordfish BASIC any 18F PIC and a PICkit2 or compatible (like my Junebug, shameless plug)
     
  3. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    I will second that. Stay away from PICAXE. It is just some expensive flimflam. Easy yes, but slow and awkward , for more complicated task than say blinking a LED.
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
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    I believe there is no cheaper nor quicker way to gain a good grip on working with hardware and software than the Arduino Duemilanove or Arduino Uno. The vast library of functions to be found at www.arduino.cc are truly insprational. For $30 plus the cost of a USB cable you can be up and running in a matter of minutes. You won't need a power supply or a programmer to get started. You mentioned that you have C# background so you should be right at home with the C language used to program the Arduino. All of the Arduino boards are AVR microcontroller based so once you have mastered Arduino and found it useful you will be able to graduate to doing your own AVR designs.

    hgmjr
     
  5. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
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    I own one.

    Really..five minutes and your going.
     
  6. mikelynch

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 30, 2007
    23
    0
    well there you go ............ I had thought myself least likely to go in the Arduino direction out of them all and most likely picaxe but now I am , after some reading swerving fast towards arduino. below is my post on Arduino site, im still waiting..............
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I am fairly new to electronics. I gather shields are premade to allow simple connection of devices to Arduino. I have found touch screen shield and XBEE shield. I might consider Nokia 6100 and Nintendo DS touch screen .

    To use both a touch screen and xbee, can both shields be simultaneously connected to Arduino ? OR do I have to choose a shield for one and then add the second by wiring it in myself.

    Which model Arduino would be good for the easiest solution ?

    I was thinking of trying a popular chip used in some schools but I have been strongly urged to follow up on Arudino. Lips Sealed

    Mike.

    http://www.liquidware.com/shop/show/TS/TouchShield+Stealth

    http://www.nuelectronics.com/estore/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id...

    http://www.digi.com/products/wireless/point-multipoint/xbee-series1-module.jsp#o...
     
  7. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
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    Be sure to take a look at www.sparkfun.com. They have a number of shield selections.

    I have three Arduino Duemilanoves and one Arduino Mega. They are very easy to work with. Be sure to take full advantage of the free libraries that are avaiable at www.arduino.cc.

    I think you will really enjoy the simplicity of using them. Search Youtube with the keyword Arduino and you will find some interesting projects that might give you some ideas.

    If you hit a snag, bring your questions back to AAC. Retched and I, among others, will see if we can get you unstuck.

    hgmjr
     
  8. mikelynch

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 30, 2007
    23
    0
    Thanks for the help. I have been to the AUSSIE SPARK FUN site actually called LITTLEBIRD are the distributors.Great site. Heaps and heeaps of well... everything!!! Just have to browse and its all there, youjust find lot you need :)

    And they are holding an Arduino workshop soon at my local university(jan 2011) .its $220 so i amnot sure if i will????????? thats a lot of parts.
     
  9. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
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    While a workshop will jump start your Arduino experience and potentially get you deeper familiarity with the Arduino hardware and software, it is by no means a necessity.

    If you can attend and the monetary hurdle is not too great then you may well benefit for the experience. I would check into the course and if possible speak with someone who has attended in the past. At that price, it sounds like they may actually include an Arduino board as part of the course. They will also probably provide you with a manual as part of the course material. A reference book may come in handy later.

    hgmjr
     
  10. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
    5,201
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    I agree. I would check to see if they include the hardware for the cost of the ticket.

    Also, if you dont have the money to burn, skip it.

    No one I know went to a workshop, and they can do amazing things with an Arduino.

    The way it is setup now, the experiments that come with the arduino and the website is more than enough to get you versed in the device.

    I would give it a year and maybe attend the next one. ;)
     
  11. pilko

    Active Member

    Dec 8, 2008
    213
    20
    Quoted by t06afr :

    "Stay away from PICAXE. It is just some expensive flimflam. Easy yes, but slow and awkward , for more complicated task than say blinking a LED."

    I don't think it is expensive.I got started with PICAXE for $3.00 for the price of a chip and $25.00 for a USB programming cable.
    I am an old man with no prior programming experiance, but was using a PICAXE within a few hours.
    Within a couple of weeks I was using a PICAXE to control my Heat Pump, with 8 digital inputs,including DS18B20 I2C temperature monitoring. 4 analog inputs and 8 outputs.

    pilko.
     
  12. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
    6,357
    718
    I am a huge proponent of Boost C with PICs, but having worked with the AVR, I'd have to suggest an Arduino (not an AVR bare) to somebody new.

    Once you have that down, you will be able to decide what would work for your application.
     
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