Automatic PCB drill

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by jompo123, Oct 28, 2010.

  1. jompo123

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 28, 2010
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    Just for sharing, This is my final project

    Automatic Pcb Drill

    Features :
    1. Manual PCB design
    2. Automatic PCB design (from other software, *bmp )
    3. 17x13 cm PCB board max.
    4. PCB report, save, duplicate
    5. usb port
    7. OS windows XP, VISTA

    i need your opinion to refine this tool

    for pict :

    http://photoserver.ws/images/vEtW4cc5d8ef5a732.bmp
    http://photoserver.ws/images/hw2O4cc5d8ef516db.bmp
    http://photoserver.ws/images/KfFa4cc5dc56788a7.jpg
    http://photoserver.ws/images/1x8T4cc946183a2cb.jpg
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    1. If this is a drill, how can it design the PCB? Do you mean the holes may be done manually?
    2. Does this mean the app can translate other CAD files into a drill file? Why not use Gerber?
    3. No problem there.
    4. That must be a software function.
    5. USB is pretty universal.
    6. What happened to 6?
    7. If it takes data through USB, why is it OS sensitive?

    What needs refining? The X-Y platform (what is the accuracy?) or the driver application?
     
  3. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    That would be nifty it were an affordable hobby unit.

    When stated that it will accept .BMP files, how do you determine scale? Same question for other image formats, such as .PNG and .JPG?

    Is the board capture a schematic capture, or just "Drill like the picture says", if the latter, I'd highly suggest going strictly with Gerber format, as nearly all layout programs can export to Gerber type files.

    Sort of on the topic: I'm sure you've seen the "UniBit" Drills, that will start with a 1/4" hole and step it up in size up to 3/4" (step drill).

    It would be cool if one were made for PC boards, starting out at needle thin, then stepping all the way out to 0.125". May not be the most stable device, but would be kinda neat for via holes and DIP holes without having to change bits.

    Whilst I'm rambling... incorporate "mill Etching", which removes only the minimum copper with the bit, rather than etching the entire board. People do it now with an XActo knife, no reason it couldn't use a high speed mill tool with a small bit for same effect. Just need to write the software for it. This wouldn't be so useful for intricate circuits, but for hobby level stuff, it'd be kind of neat.

    No Offense, but the OP looks more like what the marketing department would put out rather than the engineer side. Please provide more details!
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Is he sharing or is he selling one.

    I am rather confused. :confused:

    Could this be another Nigerian money transfer, cancer patient, husband died, kinda thing. :eek:
    If so, Mods need to be on Alert. AAC may go bankrupt
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    The image I looked at was generated. So far, this appears to be a conceptual project with a lot of confusion between hardware and software functions.
     
  6. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    I thought the last image (http://photoserver.ws/images/1x8T4cc946183a2cb.jpg) was the implementation.

    I would like to know more on the questions raised by thatoneguy and whether the the rails and suspension give sufficient accuracy and rigidity for milling boards with SMD as well as just drilling.

    John
     
  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Did you look at the last image our OP posted? That one is definitely not computer generated, and could possibly be a working prototype.

    The use of aluminum angles for the guides is low-cost and lightweight, but aluminum has a very high temperature coefficient of expansion, so for really accurate drilling, the environment the machine is located in would need to have good temperature controls to help minimize variations.

    Aluminum is also rather soft, and flexes a good bit. Although stress on the angles would be fairly small, little errors like that tend to add up pretty quickly.

    The best construction for items like that would be cast iron, as it is hard to the point of being brittle, and is quite stable over a reasonable temperature range. However, trying to make something like that out of cast iron would be quite an effort for a hobbyist.

    The aluminum angle is a reasonable trade-off for a machine that will only see occasional hobbyist use, where a high degree of accuracy is not critical.

    It would be nice if our OP would provide more details about their project.
     
  8. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Nope, I looked at the first two on my very slow satellite connection and went no farther. Why have generated images when there is a real photo?

    That photo uncovers another possible problem - the PBC visible in the lower right is going to get covered with shavings from the PCB drill. There is copper in the shavings, so there is a likely source of failure due to a short. The power supply (?) with the visible grill work may have a fan to pull in said shavings as well.
     
  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    It is enclosed in plastic, but I agree the electronics should have some separation due to metal flakes getting in the works. I've seen other folks home made units, they tend to put a briefcase sized box next to table.
     
  10. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Actually, there is a plastic cover over the electronics. I see nothing negative about being under rather than next to the drilling spindle.

    As for the project, I think it is a neat, minimalist approach compared to all the other DIY CNC machines one sees. Most use drawer slides or rods. This uses just simple angle. The real questions for me is whether it does all that is claimed and can its use be expanded to milling?

    John
     
  11. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Alberto,
    0.05mm = 2 mils, or 2/1000 inch or 0.002". While that is quite suitable for most hobbyist-type work, it's more than an order of magnitude squared higher from what could be considered real precision machining, or 0.1 mils, or 1/10,000 inch or 0.0001".

    It is quite challenging to build a machine capable of holding such tight tolerances.
     
  12. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

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    No it is not. An order of magnitude is X10 and that squared is X100. Two thousandths divided by 100 is 0.00002" or 20 millionths of an inch.

    Two thousandths for drilling a regular PCB is probably just fine. Remember, even a drill that is perfectly located will not drill a perfect hole.

    John
     
  13. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    I was also thinking of the accuracy, or lack thereof, of the tips of resharpened carbide bits that we all (probably) use.

    John
     
  14. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    You mean I don't just spin the bit as fast as I can and push down on it as hard as I can? I've been doing it WRONG! :eek:
     
  15. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

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    I guess there are those of us who think this is a really neat project, probably done in a dorm room, and those who are disappointed it is not a Mazak or Haas. I am in the former group and want to hear more.

    John
     
  16. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

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    I agree, sound, smell, and sight are essential. I break bits when I get careless. But I got thousands of them for cheap, so it doesn't bother me. Except, getting a piece of a carbide bit out of a PCB can be a pain. If you don't get it out, the next bit is DOA. I love my son-in-law, but I asked him to machine something once on a lathe. He had no feel for the material and burned up a couple of cutters. Anyway, it was "quality " time.

    John
     
  17. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    I could see me paying for what I saw. I would like it bit beefier though. Aluminum doesn't bother me, but simple angles are not that strong. "I" beams are much better.

    The electronics would be better if it were moved, but that is minor.
     
  18. John P

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 14, 2008
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    How does the mechanism slide on the aluminum L-beams? Aluminum is a lousy material for friction, as it forms a slightly abrasive oxide. I guess wheels would run on it OK though. But as this machine gets used, glass particles from the drilling are going to drift around and find their way into the moving parts, and if there's already friction, it'll be a sad story. There needs to be a vacuum dust removal system.

    I'd have thought that any changes in accuracy caused by temperature would mostly affect the length of the lead screws; the length of the beams isn't so much an issue. But this whole thing seems to have been designed and built in a hurry.
     
  19. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Since no one else is going to answer this I will. Alberto, Mazzak and Haas, are two brands of CNC machining centers.


    http://www.mazak.com/english/index.html


    http://www.haascnc.com/home.asp
     
  20. jpanhalt

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    My apologies for missing that question. Yes, Mazak and Haas are high-end CNC machining centers.

    John
     
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