Audiophiles!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by tom66, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Audiophiles/audiophools!

    I cannot believe people believe this. I am laughing out loud - literally.

    http://www.goldensound.com/productlist/next-generation-audio-accessories

    One gigahertz??

    The scariest thing is, products like the Intelligent Chip, which according to the manufacturers, if you place upon your CD player while playing a CD it permanently upgrades the CD to make the CD sound better!?

    And, the most funny Amazon reviews I've ever seen. The CAT-6e audio link cable, 1.5m - for $999.99! http://www.amazon.com/Denon-AKDL1-Dedicated-Link-Cable/dp/B000I1X6PM/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    Fools and their money.
     
  2. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Amazon readers,you have to buy the books,right.
     
  3. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    What do you mean? Amazon sells more than books. (They even sell the oscilloscopes and test equipment, but they are a bit pricey for that.)
     
  4. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    They have a new daylite reader,does it come with books
    or buy and load.
     
  5. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    You mean the Kindle... well, I don't know, but this discussion is about audiophiles.
     
  6. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Fools will buy them.
    There's nothing we can do.

    there is always a sucker for penny
     
  7. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    The sorry fact is that so many people have no education at all, so scams like this can be passed off as real stuff. Goes on beyond "oxygen free" speaker wire, though.
     
  8. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    It's not just lack of education - magazines (or as I like to call them, "magazines") like Stereophile are paid to promote the products like they are some kind of black magic. Especially of note is how almost all of their reviews start off with skepticism, and end with somehow exclaiming the audio to be excellent, using phrases like "Soundstage depth increased, mids and highs were smoother with less grain, and the presentation became more musically involving." (In this review, they talk about a magic green pen you apply to the edge of the CD to improve the quality.)
     
  9. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    The "real" audiophiles tend to treat this stuff like revealed religion. I can only recall a couple who have come to AAC. They find that nobody buys their claims.

    One other sorry note to this - the FTC seems to have no interest in these internet scams. Apparently you can sell snake oil with no fear of prosecution. Guess it's time to roll out Lydia Pinkham's elixir and put Carter's Little Liver Pills back in production.

    These are common, too - http://www.easywater.com/

    http://clearwatergmx.com/
     
  10. tom66

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Yes - I've heard of those. I talked to someone who was completely bought into them. I tried the water and I could taste absolutely no difference.

    It's quite similar to those plug-in power factor correctors that are supposed to save the average home user money. If we were billed by power factor, then it might make sense.
     
  11. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
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    It doesn't matter if you notice any difference.

    The important point here is that those people who have bought these products do hear a difference. They get what's worth of their hard earn cash.

    They can return their purchase for money but most don't as the product works as intended.

    A scam is a situation where one cannot get one's money back if the product don't work as advertised.
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I think I would disagree with that. A scam is where a product doesn't work as advertised. A really successful scam is where people believe it does, when it doesn't. It is a matter of degree.

    I am not an audiophile, but I wish I could diagnose (by ear) distortions. That is a gift.
     
  13. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
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    Exactly.

    When those people say they actually can hear a clearer, smoother sound with a $1000 power cable, how can you challenge them as you don't have the ears they have?

    You bought one, you can't hear any difference and you return it for your money back. How can you say it is a scam, or a successful scam?
     
  14. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    A successful scam is where you get to keep the money. If the customer is happy, and the product is bogus, it is still a scam. It is legal, but that is another issue.
     
  15. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    [​IMG]
    I liked the 65 $ each clip on clip on ferrite beads. But what on earth is the "Soundstage Enhancer" gadget. 2400 for each pair even if it include cables. Is a somewhat stiff price. I quote from the site
    :confused::confused:
     
  16. Ghar

    Active Member

    Mar 8, 2010
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    Wow I didn't see that.

    What about the 2.5 lb 'magic ring' which is also just ferrite?
    The love the description of those enhancers...
     
  17. glen65

    New Member

    Nov 30, 2004
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    0
    Ive seen some spend anywhere from 80 to 120 bucks a piece
    on a wall outlet and swear up and down that it drastically
    improves the sound. Here's one example from another
    message board ...

    If that wasn't enough here's another tweak recommended by the same person.


     
  18. sceadwian

    New Member

    Jun 1, 2009
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    The mini magic rings got a giggle out of me, those are just clip on ferrites, probably cost 10-50 cents each. This is all psycology and no science, people that think these devices work or notice improved audio quality are simply fooling themselves, it's kind of sad really. And 2400 dollars is only the tip o the iceberg. I've seen 3 foot audio cables advertised for that, it's truly disturbing. No one that buys these products or sells them knows the first thing about true audio fidelity.

    Using the most sophisticated scientific equipment that exists you wouldn't be able to show on a scope any difference between the before and after waveforms.
     
  19. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Is that copper tubing oxygen free? What is the sound of vast sums of money changing hands? Is that Evian water he uses? I guess the litz wire is handy for all those freqs above 60 that the power conditioner passes. Doubtless 22 carat gold spade connectors made from vintage Krugerrands. Very good thing it manages to stay ungrounded.

    Are they *really* serious, or is this just some vast self-perpetuating joke?

    Oddly enough, I noticed in Italy that the bottled water not only has the mineral assay on the label, but a conductivity figure as well.
     
  20. sceadwian

    New Member

    Jun 1, 2009
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    Vast self perpetuating joke.