Audio range

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by aamirali, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. aamirali

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 2, 2012
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    Audio range is 20K-20Khz. Any freq b/w this I can hear right.

    If in MCU I toggle a pin in this range will I hear any sound.

    Stupid question it is. but haven't tried it.
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,154
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    Depends on what the pin is connected to. If it is not connected to any thing then you won't hear anything. If it is connected to a speaker or a piezo transducer then you will hear sound. The sound of a square wave is actually kind of harsh. The original PC had a speaker for clicks and beeps.
     
  3. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Not really. At low frequencies below about 50 hz, the primary method of sound transmission is bone conduction. You FEEL that sound more than hear it.

    Most speakers (even expensive ones) don't reproduce sound much below about 35 - 40 Hz area.
     
  4. Marc0

    Member

    Nov 28, 2011
    42
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    Yeah, and the 20kHz side of the spectrum goes down with the age...A middle aged man usually cannot hear anything above 14/15kHz.
     
  5. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
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    20 Hz to 20 kHz.

    You could hear something if you use a coupling capacitor from the MCU pin to the "Line" input of your stereo system. The square wave is rich in harmonics, so even if you start with 20Hz, you will hear all the odd harmonics (60Hz, 100Hz, 140Hz, ...).
     
  6. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    If he's lucky. I checked mine at age 42 and was hearing up to 8KHz in one ear and about 10kHz in the other. Ironically, the high pitched whine I hear all the time is at about 10kHz being "heard" in the ear that can no longer hear that high. Old age can be cruel.
     
    shortbus likes this.
  7. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
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    Nature IS.
     
  8. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Many cheap speakers cannot produce sounds below 100Hz nor above 6kHz.
    People who experienced loud noise hearing damage from guns or a nearby rock band cannot hear high audio frequencies.
     
  9. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Sometimes neither. My hearing loss is 70dB in one ear from an acoustic neuroma called vestibular schwannoma. My other ear is not much better and I cannot hear anything much above 3kHz.
     
  10. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Or worse yet: played drums in a band in high school and then rode a motorcycle for 30 years. It's amazing how the helmet wind noise from riding really does it. Don't know how loud it is but it must be pretty loud.
     
  11. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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