Audio controlled DC-AC Inverter

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by mtv22, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. mtv22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 4, 2013
    5
    0
    Hello, so my project involves flashing electroluminescent wire to music. I plan to have separate wires dedicated for specific audio frequencies (some for low, mid, and high but I will probably separate it into 5 or 6 ranges) by using some band-pass filters. That part isn't too difficult, but what is giving me trouble is that I need a DC-AC inverter. Now I want this project to be portable so it needs to run off a 9v battery and the EL wire needs to run off of ~110VAC at about 1500Hz. The amount of EL wire i'm using shouldn't consume any more than about 1watt, so I don't need a very powerful inverter. This is where things become difficult, I want to be able to make the inverter myself so it can be controlled with the audio. I really am not sure where to even start with this, because all of the schematics I can find involve a 12V DC power supply and output several hundreds of watts. In addition, I'm not sure how I can control the 110VAC for the EL wires with audio input at several different frequency ranges (one range will be <400Hz while another will be >8000Hz) when the EL wire operates at one frequency, ~1500Hz. As I'm writing this it's starting to sound almost impossible, so hopefully somebody can advise me as to whether my suspicion is true and I should just quit while I'm ahead or if this really is do-able.
     
  2. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,100
    3,034
    Not at all!

    Take a look at this recent related thread to get started. You need to add one thing, a 1500Hz signal to power the load instead of the steady DC for LEDs in that thread. Not impossible.

    As I understand it, pulsed DC would work. The EL wire, like a capacitor, would discharge during the low part of the signal and charge during the high part. But anyway, a 12V square wave from a 555 timer (for instance) could be fed to a power transformer run in reverse to step up the voltage. I've used an old wall-wart transformer for this, to get high voltage pulses from a 9V battery circuit.

    BTW, I'd never heard of EL wire before but now I want some! :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013
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