Audio amplifier simulation

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by @android, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. @android

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 15, 2011
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    Guys please tell me if you know any simulation software for simulating IC based audio amplifiers. Or if you have SPICE simulation model for TDA 2030 then please share it.
     
  2. PaulEE

    Member

    Dec 23, 2011
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    I do not know of a program that'll simulate the TDA2030 as is, but the IC datasheet usually describes the internal circuitry of the IC; you may be able to build it discretely and simulate that way...

    I'm not sure why you need the TDA2030 specifically, but the IC looks like a power op-amp based audio amplifier. These amplifiers are usually composed of an op-amp front-end with a class-AB power output stage, which could easily be put together in PSPICE.
     
  3. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    I developed Fairchild's version of the TDA2030 back in 1979. It's a pretty self explanatory usage.

    What kind of information do you need?
     
  4. @android

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 15, 2011
    178
    9
    I need spice sim model for the IC. So that I can simulate the circuit with this IC into 'multisim'.
     
  5. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    A model isn't information, I thought you wanted to know something about the part.

    As I said, I did that part over 30 years ago.

    Good luck finding a sim model.

    As a novel idea, you might try actually building it up to see how it works. Would take less time than developing a model.
     
  6. @android

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 15, 2011
    178
    9
    I know how to use it. But Actually I was looking for simulation software having in built audio IC sim models. But I didn't find any, so now looking for SPICE sim model.
     
  7. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    OK, but how could there could be any kind of sim for a product designed over 30 years ago. They didn't exist at that time.
     
  8. PaulEE

    Member

    Dec 23, 2011
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    You could've quoted my prior post and saved yourself the typing :p
     
  9. @android

    Thread Starter Member

    Dec 15, 2011
    178
    9
    Okay guys! So lets just give me internal circuitry for TDA2030. That would be very much appreciated.
     
  10. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    I don't think that this slogan can be left unchallenged. It is true that models are not unadulterated information about the devices they describe, but it is an exaggeration to imply that they contain none. In semantic terms, a model of the type used for computer simulation is information (as opposed to hardware, say). The model itself is information in the form of a netlist or other description, which itself normally refers to component models developed from measurements of real devices.

    The real difficulty here is that a simulation is just what the name implies, an artificial imitation, and always likely to differ from what a real device may do. In certain circumstances the results may be totally misleading, as when a real-life mechanism is absent from the model, or when some quirk of mathematics in the model generates behaviour which does not exist in reality. These are real shortcomings, but it would be wrong to say that models can never be helpful to us.

    I believe that actually developing a model for the device would involve learning a lot about it, not least by becoming thoroughly familiar with the circuit - but the OP should be aware that any predictions obtained are best confirmed by building and measuring real circuits.

    Using a manufacturers' model may be a less useful learning exercise, but still a useful preliminary to building the real thing. It is not a panacea to guarantee success, but it can often indicate errors which would have led to expensive waste of time and materials if only found by experiment.

    Simply building a circuit and enjoying the result may well be quicker than modelling it. It can be a useful exercise in itself, but in the end may lead to less being learned than if some attempt at simulation was also made, even if the results of the simulation turned out to be quite inaccurate.
     
  11. gootee

    Senior Member

    Apr 24, 2007
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