Are TV's ot LCD's/PLSMA TVs easy to work on?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by pfelectronicstech, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. pfelectronicstech

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 18, 2012
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    I just applied to a "Electronics technician" job that says working on TV's that have been returned by customers to manufacturer. Are TV's or LCD/PLASMA TV's hard to work on, extremely complicated or is it something that should be easy to pick up? Thanks for the help.
     
  2. #12

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    Nov 30, 2010
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    I expect they are a lot easier than they were 40 years ago when they were made without any integrated chips. Still, there are a lot of things going on in a TV. The list of things to check is very long. Without a customer complaint, you might spend an hour just to find out why it was returned. After you know what it does wrong, replacing the right part would be easier now because there are less parts.
     
  3. strantor

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    Oct 3, 2010
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    I went through a phase last year of at-home TV repair. I had about half a dozen TVs I worked on. What I saw a lot of while searching for parts, is whole boards being sold. There are a few seperate boards in a TV and I *suspect* that all you would be doing is board-level work. Swap out this board for sound problems, swap out this board for deflection issues, etc. but I've never done it in a professional capacity so I'm not sure.

    You might ask this question on electro-tech-online.com; there's a guy over there called TVtech and he could probably give you a good answer.
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

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    CRT is child's play, LCD will be child's play with a year or two. I hate plasma's....too freakin heavy and confusing to work with
     
  5. R!f@@

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    And who do u think I am ? :eek:
     
  6. pfelectronicstech

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 18, 2012
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    Thanks for the reply's guys, I really appreciate it. Here is what I am confused about as far as the job itself goes, I thought TV repair type jobs would pay just AWFUL but this is 18-20 an hour. That threw me off, this would be a dream job for a guy like me that is 11 exams away from graduation. I doubt they'd take me on, having not graduated yet, and having no experience but applied anyway. I thought I'd give it a try. What do you think? Thank you again for the help.
     
  7. R!f@@

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    I can provide online TV solution help if you like.
     
  8. pfelectronicstech

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    Jan 18, 2012
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    I'm not quite following, what are you asking? Thanks again for the help.
     
  9. R!f@@

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    I am telling u tht if u run into a problem tht is say u can't fix just lemme know.
     
  10. #12

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    Nov 30, 2010
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    Replying to post#6
    No matter what your education, the first thing you will do is feel stupid.
    That is not a sign that you should quit immediately.
    The least you should be equipped with is a block diagram of how a TV works.
    You should know: Tuner, IF, sound seperation, sweep seperation, AGC, convergence, and several others. On your first day, you should take home a set-up sheet and read everything on it, twice. The next day, return the first setup sheet and choose another model to take home its setup sheet.

    If you're lucky, someone will be assigned to "bring you up to speed". You can also ask here, but that is likely to be inconvenient while you're supposed to be working.
     
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  11. K7GUH

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    Jan 28, 2011
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    Board level swap-out became the norm in the late 1970's on IBM mainframes. No one can afford to do component level repair on complex multi-level PCB's in the mass market. so "repair" is becoming a lost art.
     
  12. #12

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    I just fixed my Sanyo 31" crt TV yesterday and it only has 1 board in it. If all you do is "board swap" your job will be very easy on that model!
     
  13. pfelectronicstech

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 18, 2012
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    Thanks I appreciate the help. I also appreciate the offer to ask the TV repair guy questions if I get stuck on something, appreciate that very much. Now do you think a student ET has any shot at this job? I personally doubt it, but still gave it a shot. Do you think they'd pay a 18 to 20 an hour just to swap out boards? Sounds too easy, no? Thanks again.
     
  14. #12

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    My first 40 hour electronics job was TV repair, and I dropped out of tech school after 14 months. Apparently "mind reading" was in the last semester because I can not tell from here if an unknown corporation will give you the same job I got after not completing what you are completing.
     
  15. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

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    assemblers with no troubleshooting skills at all can make 18$/hr. I think board level troubleshooting is worth 18$/hr. 18/hr isn't really that much these days. 37,000$/yr gross, probably couldn't even get a mortgage.
     
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  16. pfelectronicstech

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 18, 2012
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    I agree 18 an hour is not much but guys on here were telling me I might have to settle for a job at 9 bucks an hour, which would NEVER happen. I can drive a truck for 18 or 20 bucks an hour. A Master CET in my area said to expect 18 to 22 an hour fresh out of school but guys on here made me SUPER nervous telling me I'd have to settle for 9 bucks an hour which like I said would NEVER EVER happen. I mean if you think I'm busting my butt, for a year and half reading all these books and doing all this school work for 9 bucks an hour, you must be crazy. I'd be just fine, 100% fine with 18 an hour right out of school. Thanks again for the help.
     
  17. dataman19

    Member

    Dec 26, 2009
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    R!f@@ will be a great reference.
    ..
    As for your job - I would suspect it is a board level position...

    ..
    This means you will probably be repairing at a board level (not just module swapping)....
    ..
    18-20 hourly is about right at entry level...
    ...
    By the way, Manufacturing uses the "Mock Up" configuration. This means the individual boards are placed into a jig, the jig provides the voltages and the loads, all you have to do is measure the reference voltages and current readings to isolate to the circuitry affected.
    ...
    As already stated by another forum member - you are the newbee... so you will feel a little awkward and challenged at the start (everyone working there already knows this). If you have a decent understanding of electronics, this is a more than excellent opportunity to hone those tech skills.
    ....
    If you are only board swapping, then there are test points and jigs for that as well... So don't feel like you need to be afraid of the challenge....
    ..
    Grab the bull by the horns and dance....
    ...
    Oh yea - Good luck.... Wish you all the best...



     
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  18. pfelectronicstech

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 18, 2012
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    Thanks for the post, and thanks for the info and nice words. I doubt I have a shot having not graduated yet, but ya never know so I applied.
     
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