Arduino & industustrial acceptance

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by aamirali, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. aamirali

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 2, 2012
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    I want to work on arduino. In past I have worked on ST/NXP/TI MCU.
    I also want to learn arduino as hobbyist.

    But I have seen there is very less acceptance of arduino in industry around me.
    People don't use it. I don't understand why is it so.

    It has huge library but still less acceptability.
     
  2. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
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    Arduino is a platform that uses the Atmel chips. I doubt that anyone is going to make a commercial product based on "Arduino" but there are many products based on Atmel chips. It is perfectly possible to use the Arduino libraries (written in C) without using the Arduino platform.

    Personally I think Arduino is a great little platform for hobby/small projects and as you say there are loads of libraries and support for it so it quick to prototype. You can then just blow your finalized code on to an MCU and include that on in your own PCB.
     
  3. aamirali

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 2, 2012
    415
    1
    Why people don't make commercial products based on Aruduino.
    Is there any license issue?
     
  4. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
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    No Arduino is open source. The issue is that Arduino defines a board with a voltage regulator, USB-Serial chip, certain pin-outs etc. and you might not need these in you production product. Also Arduino uses a boot loader to make it easy to load programs without a hardware programmer, again you may not want this in a production product where the chips are programmed as part of the assembly process.

    There are a whole range of options though with Arduino, Google "Breadboard Arduino" as an example. An other example is that you can use the Arduino environment with a hardware programmer to program chips directly, avoiding the FTDI chip and bootloader.

    It always seems to me to be a bit like back in the days when cheap clone IBM PCs were introduced. Loads of "experts" when around saying they were not "proper" computers and shouldn't be relied on. How wrong were they?
     
  5. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    To add to what has been said, the Arduino libraries will often conflict with each other and include dumb delays, making the performance of the device pretty abysmal.

    Why dig through someone else's code for a bug when you can just write your own that you are, at least, familiar with?
     
    BMorse likes this.
  6. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    To add to above, Arduino Due has bad DAC. People have been complaining about Arduino Due DAC for a few years now, Arduino still did not fix it. Conclusion: Arduino is ok for hobby, not good for commercial use.
     
  7. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    There is nothing to prevent your using an Arduino in a commercial app, providing you can find customers who don't mind the high price point to include a commercial product inside your commercial product.

    I would only consider using one professionally in a very low quantity (like just one or two) app such as a test fixture.

    But then again I can roll my own PIC boards so I wouldn't do that either unless I could buy a complete system board such as a color graphic touchscreen device with a PIC on the bottom.
     
  8. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
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    The flip side of that is that library code has had many eyes cast over it and many users so is less likely to have bugs than your own code, at least until your own code has had extensive testing.

    I used to use PICs but since all of what I do is runs of a few items I found the Arduino development cycle a lot faster mainly because of the libraries. Generally for more than 2 pieces the final code is blown to chips on my own boards.
     
  9. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    it's likely due to the good folks at Arduino targeting their product toward institutional and hobbyists. As well, in industry, the focus is more on the operating environment, such as conditioned I/O, stable power supplies, shielding, etc. Non of which the Arduino provides an advantage.
     
  10. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    I disagree, you may have more eyes, but the quality of understanding those eyes have is significantly (on average) less.

    Also, each library routine writer only cares if his/her code works, and typically doesn't have a firm background in electronics and microcontroller knowledge, and only focuses on using the peripherals that are available in hardware, but not ones that are already allocated for use by other library routines (e.g. they don't share hardware peripherals well).
     
  11. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    What Industry are you in?
     
  12. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    The selling Arduino kits industry? ;)
     
    strantor likes this.
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