Arduino Basic Starter Kit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by electronis whiz, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. electronis whiz

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jul 29, 2010
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    saw this today have been hearing about these in a lot of places, but don't know much other than can program them to do things. is this kit any good? sounds sort of basic to me, but can this do more than they just give plans for. I don't know much about these, but think they have additional boards, etc that can be used for advanced stuff. if this is correct would this work with other parts? I also don't really know any programing other than small basic, SQL, some HTML and VBA. whats it like to program these things?
    link to kit. https://e.tigerdirect.com/pub/cc?_r...ucKuWN8-qjbmANoGtC6ytpksPMyhPNMzLm9GeBSKRC0ZM.
     
  2. SPQR

    Member

    Nov 4, 2011
    379
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    I like the Arduino platform.
    The experts prefer more formal microcontrollers like the PIC series - they are more powerful and flexible.
    But the Arduino is easy to get started with.

    I bought my first one about a year ago, and had it up and running with lights flashing in about 15 minutes.
    I've done lots of coding (Pascal, VB, assembly, little C++) but I must say the Arduino C is very straight-forward.
    There are tons of examples on the web to get you started.
    Do NOT worry about the code.

    The key to Arduino is that it has a fixed number of digital I/O lines, some analog, and it's easy to connect things to.

    The biggest problem I have is when uploading programs to the board.
    Sometimes the upload doesn't choose the right COM port, and I have to try a few COM ports before it uploads.

    If you want to get started in microcontrollers, in my opinion, Arduino or its equivalents is a good place.
     
  3. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    For what you get, the price is right. Arduino "clones" seem to work just fine.

    I'm one of the huge PIC fans, but my kid started with PicBasic Pro, then PICAXE, and is now playing with Arduino.

    The duino has a C like syntax, and has a TON of pre-built libraries to connect to anything, and pretty much do anything, essentially plug and play. The downsides are that you are limited in I/O, and the code gets rather large when using some libraries, which is part of the reason they use a 32k program memory AVR uC, but it works.

    The libraries are also being ported over to PIC32 which gives you a ton of I/O and lots of speed for $40 or so (compared to the Arduino DUE 32 bit, which is $65 or something like that). You aren't "locked in" to much, other than being insulated from how operations are actually performed. If you want to learn that, you can simply use C and make your own library to create the low-level routines for I2C or 1 Wire or whatnot. The compiler is gcc.

    The libraries are the reason the processor can change entirely and all the standard ports still function as they should. There are libraries and sketches for just about everything these days, one doesn't even need to know electronics to make a webserver out of one.
     
  4. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    I really like mine, Most of the problems I have found were self induced...:rolleyes: You can save half if you have the parts (leds, pushbuttons, resistors etc.) so you don't need the kit.
     
  5. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    Looks like a great starter kit to me.
     
  6. electronis whiz

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jul 29, 2010
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    this looks like a pretty good kit.
    http://www.makershed.com/Ultimate_Microcontroller_Pack_p/msump.htm
    I can also get the kit separate from the arduino board if something else would work better. but not sure if that would work with there make board, etc. they say uses standard arduino pin out, but don't know if others also use that or are different.
     
  7. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    Hardware cost-wise, that kit isn't as good of deal as the one in the OP. Seems you are paying a lot to get a book/projects with it, but if you want that, it would get you going quicker, though the net has more projects/documentation/code than you can shake a stick at.
     
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  8. electronis whiz

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jul 29, 2010
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    ok. would I have any issues if I got the kit in the original link then got the second with just the accessories. would these kits work together or do they vary?
     
  9. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    There seems to be a difference in the accessories, the second one includes motors and such, the first one has enough to get started in general, while the second one is to get started on specific projects, if that makes sense.

    Combining the two may result in some duplicate components, but you generally need more than 1 of something sooner or later anyway. :)
     
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