apprenticeship

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Mathematics!, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
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    I am wonder what the general procedure after one has the proper knowledge on the subject area to gain experience in the trades ...

    Like elevator maintainers , plumbers , electricians , Transportation Managers and Storage and Distribution Managers , nuclear operators , Detectives and Criminal Investigators , Power Distributors and Dispatchers , Administrative Services Managers ... to name a few

    Provide that one has the knowledge and wants to do the work how does one typically gain the experiences/get into the field.

    I would imagine it would be some type of apprenticeship ?

    And if it is how does one typically get to be an apprentice in this day in age when there is so many people to choose from? Basically what I am looking at is what puts you at the top of being selected as an apprentice if you are a newbie in the field with not much experience if any? ( this question is like once you can do the work or have the knowledge to be good who is going to let you enter the field)

    I know a little bit about how the plumbers / electrician trade jobs select apprentices but I was curious more so for the other jobs like elevator maintaince , and the other jobs that normally don't have a particular standardized course system.

    And for the people in those trades that are reading this how did you get into it after being schooled or maybe you just learned on the job but either way I would like to know how you did it. Also what you think about if you had to choose or train an apprentices who would you choose and where would you go to choose them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
  2. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    In manufacturing jobs where there is no union, there is commonly a progression from 'parts runner', to machine operator "B", machine operator "A", master machinist. All can be on-the-job training.

    In the chemical industry, something like raw materials staging, to Operator B, to Operator A, shift supervisor/forman.

    In union shops, there is more of an apprentice, Journeyman, Master culture. That system allows a combination of skill and years of service to be used to differentiate employees when it is time for lay-offs/promotions (contrast with teachers who are differentiated only on years of service in most school districts in USA).

    The whole transportation industry has used on-the-job training for years. Only a few schools have ever focused on transportation degrees (university of tenn). More and more logistics degrees are available but they focus more on inventory and production planning/scheduling rather than transportation (Michigan State, Penn State, Arizona State).

    Again, most of the occupations listed are on-the-job training. Copier/printer repair technicians used to be a great career for no formal education and all on the job training.

    Nuclear industry is mostly unionized and uses the apprentice/Journeyman/Master but email Homer Simpson for details.
     
  3. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
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    ok but what I am getting at if you had the know how to do it just not the experience how does one get allowed to obtain the experience?
    Jobs you have to be chosen.
    All I want is to know how to do it and do it well if I need to in a pinch. ( believe I have enough knowledge to do stuff just not the confidences until I do it a few times )

    Though I don't mind helping out here and there either
    Is there like a volunteer way that I can just go in and learn/help out these tradesman/union workers temporarily not saying I want to do this work for ever just basically testing out if I would like to do them more longer term.

    Assume I already know the book/knowledge stuff to do most of the stuff except I need now to actually have the opportunity to go and try it. (with supervision of course so I don't affect anything they value in a bad way)
    And I have to say if my job was to go around the world learning stuff from people then I think I would be happy and along the way I may give people great ideas an improving stuff as well.... maybe
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    I understand what you are saying but be careful. It could be interpreted as, "I know better than you guys with 25 years of experience. Teach me a little and I may be able to quickly solve all of your problems".

    Most companies already have a "Mr. Fix-it". A guy that seems to know about everything. Theses guys carry the load of the company's problems and keep the company successful. Companies without a Mr Fix-it are out of business.

    You have to get started somewhere and by-passing the we-old tradition is tough and you may even learn how much you don't know. And, how skillful your coworkers truly are. In other words, do you really bring so much extra knowledge or skill to the table or do you just feel really successful based on the small universe you have been exposed to until today?

    Many highschool students from small schools who are at the top of their class of 100 find they are not prepared once they get to college and have trouble getting B grades in a field of 2000 university classmates. Everything is relative.

    Industries like nuclear, chemical and airlines/aircraft must be so reliable in operations that a long apprenticeship is an absolute must. Ideas for improvement are never implemented directly in the field, the are reviewed for safety, quality, long term impact on equipment and many other factors.

    Get out there and start an apprenticeship. Work through the process at least once. Find out who your peers are and their skill level. If you can show your greatness, then move up and, finally, move out and become a consultant. It is difficult to be a credible consultant without a card, a diploma or real experience. Companies will not take financial risk of hiring you based on what you think you can do.

    I wish it worked as you describe because a lot of people could skip college and jump right into the workforce. Saving their parents tens of thousands (in USA). The diploma is mostly a ticket to play, not an assurance you are really ready to work and know everything. Even the new engineers where I work (entry level or with many years of experience) will go through a type of apprenticeship. Making sure everyone knows what is going on and why before they make any decisions on tripe ir own.