Anyone willing to program a little something for me?!?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by rokz_2005, May 24, 2011.

  1. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
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    Would anyone be willing to program a small project for me. I am absolutely crap with micro controllers and programming.

    I was wondering if someone could write me a program (codes) for the following
    When the button 1 is activated I would like a series of (5) LED's to light up in a sequence and then to stay on for 10 seconds - then cut the power.
    I would like button two to activate the same series of LED's to come on but in reverse order. If button 1 or 2 is pressed while the LED's are lighting up I want the whole circuit to reset (Basically back to start) if it makes sense :p

    I am super interested in electronics and outside of my work hours I am reading c programming and stuff to help me. I hope you nice folks can help me out. Thanks
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,779
    933
    I don't write micro controller code, but I can tell you this much.

    Without providing more information, you will not get much help. What kind of micro controller are you planning on using? How will you be accessing the micro, for upload of the code? Those would be a few questions that, if you could provide answers to them, would help whoever decides to assist you in this project.

    And last but not least, we like to know that the person we are helping is actually TRYING to do the work. Please demonstrate in some way, how you are trying to accomplish this task yourself. Pictures would be good. Or a schematic/block diagram of your idea at least.
     
  3. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    If you're willing to spend $50 on a PICkit 2 Low Parts Count Demo package, you'll get hardware and software along with lessons that will do most of what you want. Most importantly, if you go through the lessons, you'll learn how to do this yourself (it's pretty easy).
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
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    I tend to agree with someonesdad from a different slant. If you are actively working on the project and get stuck then you will find getting help much easier. It is a steep learning curve, one I haven't climbed yet, but it will save you a fortune later in projects, as software is much cheaper than hardware. I had a teacher in college that made a similar comment, skull sweat is cheaper that hardware, but this was long before microcontrollers.

    The thing is, if you are working the project people know you are trying. It is more likely someone wills step up to the plate, and lend a hand instead of a finished project.

    Just my 2¢.
     
  5. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
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    If you get the PICKIT, get a PIC16F628 chip as well. It can easily handle your requirements and is easy to use.
    We probably won't write it for you but will give you some decent tips.
     
  6. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
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    Or you can find someone to do some programming for you. Typical charges are in the $50-$100 per hour (or more) range, depending on the consultant.
     
  7. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
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    Hi thanks for that. I am totally dazed out looking at microcontrollers and I had no idea what to look for.

    after taking your advice I looked for the microchip and found this. It brings out multiple options which causes more more confusion.
    I have ordered the pickit but I'm stuck on the chip :(

    http://gb.mouser.com/Search/Refine.aspx?Keyword=PIC16F62
     
  8. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
    68
    0
    Hi thanks for that. I am totally dazed out looking at microcontrollers and I had no idea what to look for.

    after taking your advice I looked for the microchip and found this. It brings out multiple options which causes more more confusion.
    I have ordered the pickit but I'm stuck on the chip

    http://gb.mouser.com/Search/Refine.a...yword=PIC16F62
     
  9. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
    68
    0
  10. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
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  11. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
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    Don't spend any money on any microcontroller family that requires you to purchase the 'Programming Editor' software.
     
  12. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
    474
    31
    You might find more help in the Programmer's Corner Forum (where this thread should have been started).
     
  13. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
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    I'm such a big advocate of (FREE) Picaxe that I've been meaning to write up a sticky-esc text doc that I would just paste into threads like this or provide a link to just one picaxe post. I think I'll include a .zip file that will contain a screen shot video of the editor and their slick simulator in action. IMO Picaxe is a hands down winner for those that have shied away from uCs do to a fear of programming.

    The day that I decided I had nothing to loose by downloading the free Picaxe software, I spent the afternoon running and modifying the sample code in their .pdf manuals. I didn't even own a Picaxe chip at the time! I was able to do it because the Picaxe editor includes two run buttons. One downloads your code to the chip and the other runs a built in simulator. By the time my chips arrived in the mail, I'd written over ten of my own programs. When I downloaded them to the chip there was no surprises. The programs ran on the chip just like they did in the simulator.

    Over the years I've built many 555 based (none life saving) circuits for the hospital I contracted with. Picaxe has now replaced the 555 for even the simplest of my designs. A Picaxe solves 98% of situations. Like when a department head says... "Well yeah it works OK, but I was hoping that the Piezo would beep a bit longer and I don't want it to beep until the door has been opened and closed three times and only when a large mass, such as Bertha Butt, walks through the door! By the way, can this thing be interfaced to my PC? I'd like to keep a log of the traffic and .......".
     
  14. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    When reality bites, microcontrollers become the preferred snack... :D
     
  15. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
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    Ain't that a fact!;)
     
  16. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
    68
    0
    Does the PIC16F628 require me to buy programs? or can I use c++ with it?

    Thanks for the helpful advice
     
  17. rokz_2005

    Thread Starter Member

    May 14, 2011
    68
    0
    PIC16F628 is this pic axe compatible?
    or is picaxe and pickit the same thing
     
  18. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    You can download Microchip's MPLAB and install it. A version of C and a version of Assembler come with it.

    PICAXE uC's start off with Microchip PIC uC's, and they add bootloader software to make it easy to load programs coded in a form of the BASIC language. Microchip PICs don't come with a bootloader installed.
     
  19. CDRIVE

    Senior Member

    Jul 1, 2008
    2,223
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    Sgt. Wookie did a good job of answering your Picaxe questions but I'd like to re-phrase this paragraph. Not because it's wrong but because I want to be clear of what the benefit of a Picaxe is as compared to a blank PIC. Change the text in bold to read.. "makes it much, much, much easier to learn how to program a Picaxe". Did I say EASY???

    Attached is one of the many free .pdf manuals that are supplied with the Picaxe download. Check out the simple program on page 4.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2011
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