Any pointers on what this component might be?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by JJS1234, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
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    Hello everyone, been awile since I have posted. Things have gone well since then.

    I had a quick question to ask. I was planning on re-using a motherboard of mine, since I got a new computer. I was looking at it, as I saw 2 bulging caps and this (pic below). I think it is a resistor, however I googled that number and didnt come up with anything.

    It broke off as you can see, I believe I saw some heat damage (after 5+ years of continued use) I cant say much more.


    [​IMG]


    Any and all help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
    611
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    Pretty sure it's a fuse, possibly by Tyco (TE Connectivity) but not sure of the value.

    Edit: Found it here. A Polyswitch resettable device.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
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  3. mbxs3

    Active Member

    Oct 14, 2009
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    JJS1234 likes this.
  4. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
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    Cool! Thanks guys!


    I found a replacement on DigiKey. Here.

    Anyway, its 5 yrs old. Atleast the processor (AMD 64 x2 5000+) Is probably still in good condition.

    I dropped it off at school and picked it up, perhaps a kid was screwing with it. Not sure. Anyhow got a 6.3v 1500uF cap I need to replace their too.
     
  5. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
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    Oh forgot to add, I took it off, and looked at the bottom side, part of it looks probably like extreme heat damage, but when I soldiered it back on and connected a power supply to the motherboard, it started right up. So.. hmm.

    Perhaps it works and/or it is of use to a minuscule system that is not primary. Either way ordered a replacement.

    Just want to say thanks.


    PS. Any ideas how to get the rest of the dust off? I used compressed air but what you see is after that. Maybe a cloth or something?
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
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    Dust? Most people don't know this, but water can be used on almost any electronic device as long as ALL of it is gone before applying power.

    I actually saw a vacuum tube television that had gone down with a boat resurrected by simply rinsing it out with fresh water and waiting a month for it to dry out.
     
  7. VoodooMojo

    Active Member

    Nov 28, 2009
    503
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    I am banking on that and so far your statement is holding water, pun intended.

    Irene came by and filled the water table to the surface and then Lee came and camped out for a couple days and left behind 2 feet of silt and mud after the 4 feet of water left my shop.
    All the equipment was considered to be destroyed but after disassembling all the gear, pressure washing it and letting it lay about in the yard (Sanford and Son comes to mind) to let dry out, things are coming back to life. Five gallons of WD40 to soak all moving parts, contactors and switches has helped with the welding equipment and compressors and I am hoping the finer pieces (scopes and meters) will be ok after a bask in the sunlight and heat lamps....

    get flood insurance......quick:cool:, before the next storm!
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Back in the 70's, had a television with a picture that was really getting nasty. The inside of the set was gooped up with dust, cobwebs, and other nasty stuff. This was a tube set.

    Took the chassis outside, hosed it down, and let it dry in the sun for a few days. It worked just fine after that. Left it with friends years ago.
     
  9. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
    41
    0
    Wait what?

    I umm, plugged it in already, the caps are probably charged. So how would I do this? Or can I anymore? How long should I wait for the caps to de-charge if I need to wait?
     
  10. VoodooMojo

    Active Member

    Nov 28, 2009
    503
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    transformers and other coils can hold moisture for a considerable amount of time. Blow dryers or compressed air will speed the drying time.
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    The attic is a good place to find moderate heat (low relative humidity) and a fairly good air flow.

    As for, "I already plugged it in"...you need a wayback machine to get to where you let it completely dry out BEFORE plugging it in. PS, the caps will discharge long before all the water escapes.
     
  12. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
    41
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    Thats not what I mean. I mean that I plugged it in to test it about 5 hrs ago. If I decide to toss the motherboard into the tub, wont that discharge the caps and potentially damage something?
     
  13. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
    1,425
    363
    When I wet clean a board, I blow most of the water out with compressed air then rinse the remaining water with alcohol, blow that out and quick dry with a heat lamp and slow fan so there's no time for corrosion to occur. Most boards can be powered up again in less than an hour.
     
  14. JJS1234

    Thread Starter Member

    May 26, 2011
    41
    0
    I dont mean to keep repeating a question, but if a capacitor is fully charged will it damage a component if I through the board into water?
     
  15. colinb

    Active Member

    Jun 15, 2011
    351
    35
    You should really use deionized water or distilled water for washing electronics. Deionized water is used in industrial PCB fabrication processes to clean water-based flux residues.

    Tap water will leave behind some nasty minerals and other impurities that may result in problems even after it is dry. Deionized and distilled water is not conductive and will not leave residue behind when it evaporates.
     
  16. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
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    Try measuring the voltage on the capacitors. You aren't getting your question answered because nobody knows exactly how long it takes for a mother board to discharge. I'll bet it goes down in less than 5 minutes. When I'm changing a part in a computer, I turn off the power and press the start button to waste the power in the mother board. The little LEDs go out in a couple of seconds. If I didn't press the start button, the LEDs would probably run for less than a minute.
     
  17. colinb

    Active Member

    Jun 15, 2011
    351
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    I bet most of that stored energy is in the big SMPS capacitors, too, so if the mobo is disconnected, it should discharge even faster—although there would be no LEDs to drain energy...
     
  18. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I mentioned that because my MoBo has at least one LED. I just happened to notice it while replacing the HDD and the DVD burner.
     
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