Any Idea How To Make a 1 Henry Inductor?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by MarFene, Aug 15, 2015.

  1. MarFene

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 27, 2014
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    or am i asking too much? i know that 1 henry is a big value , but any idea if i can make one?
     
  2. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    5 and 10 henry inductors were a common item in old tube equipment.

    An E-core from a transformer and some wire. What freq? are you planning to operate it?
     
  3. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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  4. MarFene

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 27, 2014
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    audible frequencies even though i don't plan on going further than 8KHz.


    @BR-549 im starting to get an idea of the size of this thing , do you think it is feasible for handwinding?
     
  5. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    A one Henry coil does not like any frequency.

    These were used in high DC voltage, linear power supplies.

    It helped to reduced 60 and 120 ripple with low capacitance caps.

    At that time, wire was cheaper than high voltage caps.

    You will find a nice voltage drop across it when supply is loaded.

    If you use one in a supply, the secondary voltage needs to be increased, to make up for that drop.

    There are advantages and disadvantages to different choke configurations.

    They were quite common in the first half of the last century.
     
  6. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    The advantages of using a choke in a power supply are:
    1) It smooths the output current and eliminates the large peak current and voltage of a capacitive input filter so that the full rated current capacity of the transformer can be used (as compared to the 50-60% derating required for a capacitor filter).
    The average output dc current can then be equal to the rated RMS transformer current and the rectified voltage under load approximately equals the average (rectified) AC output voltage, not the peak.

    2) It provides a lower ripple voltage than a pure capacitor filter.
     
  7. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Depends on what current you want it to handle. High current needs thick wire. Very thick wire is harder to wind neatly. On the other hand extremely fine wire breaks easily and requires some sort of jig for neat winding.
     
  8. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    AnalogKid likes this.
  9. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    You can also use chokes in series, as voltage taps from the supply.

    Just make sure you have a strong pedestal, to prevent power supply from sinking to the center of the earth.
     
  10. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    1 Henry and up to 8kHz? I've seen this request before on another forum. Are you trying to make a delay pedal for your guitar? If so, I don't see success in your future. If you want to remove all ripple from a power supply, then success is likely.

    An E core is nice because you can wind the wire on a bobbin by spinning it on a drill press grinder shaft or any other motor. Then slip it on an iron powder E core or assemble laminate plates around your bobbin to build your e-core.
     
  11. MarFene

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 27, 2014
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  12. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    That is not an active tone control. That is a 10x preamp with a passive tone control. It also, unfortunately uses a really old and limited Op amp designed 45 years ago. Remember flower power, Vietnam war, Nixon? Is that what you want to use?

    Anyhow, if you like vintage, look at the datasheet from this datasheet. Page 12 has an active tone control.

    http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/slos121b/slos121b.pdf
     
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