Advice on where and how to learn about audio amps

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Romes, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. Romes

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 30, 2014
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    So, I have been teaching myself about building circuits for a few years now, I can now read schematics pretty well, solder together amps, both valve and solid. I can modify the circuits so that I can have it look fancy, with plug in wires and things like that. Point is, I can put an amp together, but I dont understand why a .047 cap goes there, or why a 680ohm resister goes there.

    I have searched pretty thoroughly online, and have yet to find a any resources that explain what it is im doing in a way that I can understand. I started reading Valve Wizard's tutorial. I got up to cathode load lines and at that point it lost me.

    Any suggestions? Either valve or solid state or both.
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  3. MrChips

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  4. Romes

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 30, 2014
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    Thanks for the heads up.
    Actually I did start reading the ESP texts a while back, I always get to a point where the math dislodges what I'm reading from reality. I know that this fact may doom me. Although I taught myself VB, and writing code is pretty much a giant math problem.... I try to equate amplifier framework to that of, say... a car. IE: Input stage is like ignition, the Coupling caps are blankety-blank.. yada yada (just an example, not literally what I think.) I cant come up with a good analogy.....

    How do you guys and gals think of / visualize electronics?
     
  5. MrChips

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    Oct 2, 2009
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    The simplest analogy to flow of electricity is water flow, pumps, valves, piping, radiator coils, storage tanks.
    But analogies can only get you so far until it breaks down.

    Eventually, you have to study the real thing. A good start is learn and be fully knowledgeable with:

    Ohm's Law
    Batteries, power sources
    Resistors
    Series and parallel circuits

    Capacitors as storage elements
    Capacitors as reactive elements
    DC and AC circuits
    Low-pass and high-pass filters
    Frequency response

    Inductors as reactive elements
    Inductors as energy storage elements
    Reactance and impedance
    Phasors
    Power factor

    Semiconductors
    PN junction
    Diodes and rectifiers
    Zener diodes

    Transformers
    Unregulated DC supplies

    Transistors
    PNP and NPN transistors
    FET
    MOSFET

    ... just for starters.

    Take one baby step at a time. Read the AAC tutorials.
     
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  6. Romes

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 30, 2014
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    Plumbing, my god. Not sure how I didn't get there myself, especially because my father is a master plumber and I'v worked with him enough to have a decent knowledge about it.

    Anywho, I am literally going to save and print off that list and start chipping away. Do you suggest that order? If its not asking too much....

    I really do appreciate it MrChips
     
  7. MrChips

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    You're Welcome.:)
     
  8. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    You learn by doing. Work on every amplifier you can get your hands on, and don't stop until you have repaired it. You will learn why there is a .047uf here, or a 680 ohm resistor there, because you will experience the effect of those parts being bad.

    "Knowlege is not enough, one must do." Bruce Lee
     
  9. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    Two thoughts

    See if there are any issues of the now defunct american magazine Audio Amateur in your area.

    Try this site as well as AAC

    http://www.diyaudio.com/
     
  10. Romes

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 30, 2014
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    Fair enough, guess the eyes are scared while the hands make progress (Russian saying, translated poorly).

    Thanks for the responses.
     
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