advice needed for haptic device

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Agile ARK, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. Agile ARK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 18, 2014
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    0
    hi all

    am trying to connect an http://arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardUno

    a haptic driver (board) - http://www.fairchildsemi.com/an/AN/AN-FEBFAH4830.pdf

    and actuators (small motors) - https://catalog.precisionmicrodrive...-100-10mm-linear-resonant-actuator-3-6mm-type

    to create a small haptic device that I can control with the the arduino to give users of a web application haptic alerts.

    I'm a complete noobie (cant even read the literature because I dont know what the symbols mean) and dont want to plug things in and see smoke!

    Just wondering if anyone could offer any practical advice or could help with the project?

    thanks

    A.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2014
  2. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    1,393
    There is a connection diagram on page 5 of the driver board datasheet. And without meaning to be rude, this project may require you to delve into some fundamentals before tackling this.
     
  3. Agile ARK

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 18, 2014
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    0
    hi. thanks for response. I noticed diagram but am still unsure if I can actually power haptic driver from arduino or if it needs its own power supply (asked some people I know locally but got conflicting advice)

    the arduino uno website says:

    The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.
    The power pins are as follows:

    VIN. The input voltage to the Arduino board when it's using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin.

    5V.This pin outputs a regulated 5V from the regulator on the board. The board can be supplied with power either from the DC power jack (7 - 12V), the USB connector (5V), or the VIN pin of the board (7-12V). Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it


    So my thinking it is power Arduino with a 9v battery because USB wont be enough and then power my haptic board from the regulated 5v pin? (I think it needs 3v to work if I am reading specs correctly)

    I suppose what I'm trying to achieve isn't a million miles from the example in link below. (think I am trying to do something very similar to example 4 - the PWM to LRA)

    http://www.wirelessdesignmag.com/art...rs-pwm-signals

    (again thanks for responding and I'm sorry if these questions are ridiculous or my observations way off point)
     
  4. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
    3,869
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    Attached is the datasheet for the FAH4830 IC. I have only briefly scanned it, but I think that it says the IC will operate with a supply voltage up to 5.5V, but it recommends a 3.3V supply. I do not see on the operating instructions for the evaluation board any facility for supply voltage regulation, so I assume that it requires a regulated supply voltage.

    It seems that the Arduino Uno will operate directly from a 5V USB supply, or from a 7-12V supply via its on-board 5V regulator. So, yes it seems that you could use a 9V battery as the power source (although a 9V battery won't last very long.) Further, I think the Arduino Uno has an on-board 3.3V regulator, and if that is correct, that is where I would get the power for the FEBAH4830 evaluation board.

    Please understand that I have never seen or used either one of these devices, and my information is limited to what I have learned through a cursory examination of the datasheets. Please consider my input as guesswork, and check it out before you connect things together.

    Hopefully, someone else will come along who has hands-on experience, and provide better information.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
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