Advice from soldering experts

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by kareem101, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. kareem101

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    5
    1
    I have this part spu0410LR5H-Qb ,, that has the soldering pads under it,, I want to solder it manually "unfortunately" :( ,, any help about how to do it ?
     
  2. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
    4,887
    1,017
    This is not a trivial procedure. You will need a stencil and use the reflow process. Check section 3.5 of the Deign Guide.

    Below is an image from the Design Guide. Looks like you have more problems than just soldering. There are lots and lots of other design issues to consider too. Have you checked with places like Sparkfun to see if there is one with a breakout board?

    upload_2015-12-29_7-41-46.png

    A gasket must be made of acoustically opaque materi
    al that prevents sound from passing through
    it. The material must seal completely to the case
    and to the microphone or PCB. In a stack-up
    tolerance analysis, the gasket must form a compress
    ion fit in worst case (large gap) conditions,
    while compressing enough in small gap conditions to
    avoid bulges in the product case or the
    walls of the acoustic path. Good acoustic sealing
    prevents echo, noise, and frequency response
    problems that can result from resonant air volumes
    inside the product housing and from alternate
    paths to the mic port-hole.
    The manufacturability of the mic-gasket-case assemb
    ly must also be considered. The assembly
    process must be designed to reliably align the hole
    s in the gasket to the holes in the case and mic
    or PCB in volume production. Side-port or end-port
    gasket designs are more difficult to
    assemble, since the required gasket compression for
    ce is often parallel to the surface of the
    microphone and perpendicular to the usual case comp
    ression force as shown in figure (a) below.
    These types of gaskets can have problems with leaks
    during assembly, but a well-designed
    assembly process or a gasket design such as that sh
    own in (b) can form good seals.
     
    kareem101 and cmartinez like this.
  3. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    2,519
    785
    I see six pads. How about using a veroboard, some jumperwires and a 1x6 pin header?

    Solder the wires to the pads, and to the pin header. The you'll make your own breakout-board. :)
     
    kareem101 likes this.
  4. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
    5,813
    1,105
    Can you mount it 'dead-bug' style?
     
    kareem101 and cmartinez like this.
  5. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
    3,574
    2,549
    Yeah.... I'd probably glue the thing upside down on the PCB, and then solder wire hairs from its pads to the board's traces. But I'd also use low temp solder paste, so as to not damage the part.
     
    kareem101 likes this.
  6. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
    4,887
    1,017
    It looks to me like you can't just solder this thing down. It needs to be mounted properly so it functions as designed.
     
    kareem101 likes this.
  7. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
    3,574
    2,549
    You may be right. But if it's firmly glued to the PCB, all the user would need to do is build a proper acoustic box around it. Then again, there's only one way to know if he did things correctly...
     
    kareem101 likes this.
  8. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
    822
    229
    Apply solder to the pads on the PCB. Make sure that the solder height on each pad is as close to equal as you can get. I sight the height by looking from the edge across the solder. Tin the pads on the device with solder, then wick all the excess solder off using solder wick. Apply paste solder flux to both the PCB pads and the part pads. Using a heat gun, flow the solder on the PCB, then place the part on the melted solder. Continue heating the part and the board until the part is grabbed by the solder. You can tell that the part is grabbbed by gently nudging the part. It will move with the nudge, then return to its proper position.

    Be careful. You can easily add too much heat and damage both the part and the PCB.

    All this assumes that you have a proper PCB with correct pads and solder mask waiting for you to place the part. Without a good board, you probably won't succeed in soldering the part.
     
    kareem101 likes this.
  9. kareem101

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 5, 2015
    5
    1
    OK thanks all for ur replay, I am not worried about its performance, Right now I am leaving hanging in the air and soldered its pads via wrap wire. And it is working great, the guy that designed The analog circuit for this thing did a great Job, it is sensing the ultrasonic 80Khz meter away.

    I am more worried about the soldering, I will try as SLK001 suggested, although this may damage the mic, the damn thing is 260 celsius degree max for 20-40 sec, If it got damaged, I will glue it as cmartinez suggested and wire from pads to PCB. will let u know the results.

    Thanks.
     
    cmartinez likes this.
  10. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
    822
    229
    If you let the solder flow on the pads, then place the part on the molten solder, your time exposure for the part will be less than 10 seconds (using regular 60/40 solder). Once you do this a few times, you will actually see when the part is "grabbed" by the solder and you can stop the hot air a few seconds later. With a difficult part like this to place, it should be the first part placed and soldered.
     
    cmartinez likes this.
Loading...