advice for who's plans to follow for cnc controllers?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by eddie6775, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. eddie6775

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 6, 2013
    17
    0
    I guess the title is self explanatory, but a bit of background should help my cause. I plan on building something similar to Tom McGuire's.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Easy-to-Build-Desk-Top-3-Axis-CNC-Milling-Machine/

    I like his design but am looking for suggestions. I'm somewhat new to electronics but have completed the Mims books and can understand and breadboard schematics with a pretty good success rate. I cannot and do not have the means to do toner transfer at this time and don't plan on using it for this project . After I breadboard it, it will be transferred directly to R.S. perforated boards. I'll be running this contraption with EMC2 Linux.

    *Any dummy proof suggestions as to a super simple motor controller I can build? Break out board as well? ...Or is this my golden ticket?


    I realize this is probably a common question but I'm still kind of 'rock stick fire' here and haven't found much on the web. Electronics isn't my main hobby. I just want the machine for small foundry patterns and PCB fabrication (some day).

    Thanks in advance!
    Eddie

     
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,770
    970
    Not a diy controller but I'm really impressed with TinyG and just finished up a CNC based assembly machine at work using it.
    https://www.synthetos.com/webstore/index.php/tiny-g.html

    best part is you DON'T need EMC2 or a "somewhat" powerful computer and no worries about latency issues.
    There is just a TinyG App for Android tablets that works great or their TgFx software for a laptop/computer.

    spend your time/money on making the mechanical aspects of the machine all rigid/smooth and just buy the controller.

    You just need TinyG board, stepper motors and a 24V DC power supply capable of supplying the required current for your steppers. (24V @10A is plenty usually and cheap)
     
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