Adding Infrared Receiver to PC Speaker System

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Fariida, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    Can anyone help with adding a IR relay like the one in the video to an existing PC speaker system. It's a 5.1 set up and plugs into an outlet with a 3.5mm output. The power button is on one of the satellite speakers and I want to use an IR receiver to turn on and off the system. I guess mainly what I want to know is do I need an external power source for the relay or can it work off of the speakers? It also has a knob for volume. Would it be possible to connect that also? Another thing...I was researching relays, would I need to use that, or should I use that instead. I just want to turn the speakers on and off at the moment to experiment. I can add pics of the internal components if needed. Thanks!
     
  2. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    What video?

    Ron
     
  3. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    opps! sorry
     
  4. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
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    You definintely need an external power source for the relay, you can't just power it from the speakers.
     
  5. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    Oh, that video. :)

    The unit in the video is just a slot sensor, not really what you want. However, to control something from across a room IR is a good way to go. Simple On / Off functions are more easily done that functions like volume control (raise and lower audio volume) as is common on most TV sets and home entertainment systems.

    Starting with basic On and Off functions the first thing you need to do is understand how the device to be controlled actually turns On and Off, could be as simple as bypassing a switch to more complicated. A Google of IR Control Kits should yield some results. Just remember, it's all about controlling what you have so knowing how what you have actually works is essential.

    Ron
     
  6. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    ahh great! Thanks for all of your replies. :) I'll report back with results hopefully I don't trash the whole thing, lol.
     
  7. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    One more thing. I see a lot of tutorials of hooking up the IR Receiver to a microcontroller. Would I need to use this to program the settings of the remote of just on and off? I'm trying to research this but I'm not finding any clear answer.
     
  8. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    Connecting IR receivers to a micro-controller has become popular, be it Arduino, PICAXE or a host of other micros. Here is what is going on in reality. If you look for example at your TV remote control. The thing is loaded with functions the TV does. On/Off, Raise / Lower the volume, Channel Up / Down and the list goes on. So how does the TV know what to do when you press a function button on the remote? When you press a button on the IR transmitter it sends an encoded modulated pulse train to the receiver. The receiver removes the carrier (demodulates) and reads the actual pulse train or data. You can send that data to anything that will decode it and know what to do with it.

    Some household devices and appliances are turned On and Off quite simply while others like your computer for example are more complex. This is why when we want to make a device do something remotely we first need to know how the device operates.

    Ron
     
  9. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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  10. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    On / Off buttons like pictured are generally push On and On is maintained and push Off where Off is maintained. They normally turn a power supply on and off which is in the large bass unit. Should that be the case using an IR control would amount to having two channels where a push of a button latches a relay with normally open contacts across a switch and pucshing another button unlatches the relay. The downside without getting complex is the IR will overide the button on the speaker.

    Ron
     
  11. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    I kind of figured something would have to be done about the button. Do you think I could just take those wires connecting to the existing relay? Would be a good thing to do since I could only turn on and off with a remote?
     
  12. Reloadron

    Active Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    Possible, I can't say as I haven't seen the circuit.

    Ron
     
  13. Fariida

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2015
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    oh man! i went to investigate and take pics of the speaker but can't find the screws! lol I didn't wan't to break it so i'll have to carefully check to pry it open. I might just do an easy cop-out in the meantime to rig a extension cord.
     
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