AC solenoid used outdoors?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by bio88, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. bio88

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 17, 2011
    34
    0
    I've got an AC solenoid actuating a door outside exposed somewhat to the elements. It is within a container but water can enter the container through cracks. So yes, it can get wet from time to time.

    What is needed to bring this up to code? UL cert?

    If I ever wanted to market this device it would be hard to enclose the solenoid in a NEMA 4 box when the stroke needs to penetrate the box.
     
  2. Dyslexicbloke

    Active Member

    Sep 4, 2010
    420
    19
    If you are talking 120 / 240 Vac you wont get an answer here save to say you should be using a solanoid designed and certified for the purpose.

    I would recomend going to a low voltage design anyway ...

    Sorry
    Al
     
  3. bio88

    Thread Starter Member

    Feb 17, 2011
    34
    0
    I agree thanks. My whole concept appears to be a death machine. The AC solenoid works so well while a DC has very little power to stroke ratio. The AC just slams the door so fast and with a bang it is impressive.

    My other design is using DC using a motor and gear. It is very smooth in operation and quiet. I will stick with a low voltage option thanks.
     
  4. Dyslexicbloke

    Active Member

    Sep 4, 2010
    420
    19
    Have you considdered a standard spring / hydrolic door closer, the kind you find in almost all comertial buildings. That would close your door all the time unless you held it open.

    You would then need a holding magnet, there are all sorts available at 12v and 24v that are designed to operate with fire and security systems.

    Open the dor all the way and they power up, holding it there. Drop the power remotly and the door will close.

    Not what you asked I know but I just wanted to make sure you you were aware of the options IE Low power DC, simple and fail safe.
    Al
     
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    If a plunger has to penetrate a wall, use a corrugated rubber boot as a seal. Easy and low cost if you can use something off the shelf. If you don't grok the application, look up a bellows on a vacuum system and it will become clear.

    Of course, you'll also need to meet safety requirements, so you may want to consult a safety professional about your design requirements and options.

    If I was designing such a thing, I'd first see if I could use a rotary shaft to penetrate the box. This would then just require a simple o-ring seal, even cheaper and easier to make. Or find a cheap bearing seal used in high volume in the auto market.
     
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