AC motor run capacitor

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by walley10291, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. walley10291

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2009
    1
    0
    I understand that a motor run capacitor allows the motor to run smoother and more efficiently; my question is, can a run cap be added to a motor that does not already have one, and if so, how to calculate the correct size ( mfd ) that would be needed? Thanks
     
  2. RAH1379

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2005
    69
    1
    i believe the purpose of the capacitor is to get the motor started because of the inrush current demand, once the motor gets up to about 80% of speed a centrical switch usually cuts it out of the circuit.
     
  3. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
    2,574
    230
    That's a "start" capacitor, not a "run" capacitor.

    Check pages 19+ on
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/6883830/TutorialMotorBasicsLecture

    Ken
     
  4. RAH1379

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2005
    69
    1
  5. zisuo88

    New Member

    Oct 30, 2009
    1
    0
    wow,I have a same question,thank you
    I read this thread,and so lucky I got may answer!
     
  6. electr

    Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    49
    0
    look for power factor correction capacitors.
    There are great links out there (also on this website) that guide you throught the cap's value calculation.
     
  7. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
    408
    19
    Motor run capacitors correct the power factor, thus reducing the line demand current. The motor's current remains unchanged. A general rule that I use says that 50 mfd. capacitance corrects 10 amperes @ 480 VAC / 60 Hz.
     
  8. electr

    Active Member

    May 23, 2009
    49
    0
    You cant set the capacitance without knowing the motor's inductance.
    By doing that, you can even increase the current's intake.
     
  9. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    a permanent split capacitor motor will have it's oil filled cap in series with an auxiliary winding. This provides an out of phase current for the appropriately positioned winding, giving smoother operation. This is a bit different than a capacitor start where the start winding is only engaged until the speed hits about 75% of rated speed, and is used for starting torque.

    Power correction is a different beast all together, and you need to ask if it's worth the effort.
     
  10. htroberts

    New Member

    Jun 22, 2012
    5
    0
  11. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
    No, I can't see it either. :?
     
  12. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
  13. htroberts

    New Member

    Jun 22, 2012
    5
    0
  14. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    I can't see it either, and I'm not a new member.

    Correction: I can see it after refreshing the page.
     
  15. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
    1,153
    304
    Still cannot see it even after refreshing page, must be on the banned list.
     
  16. ohmster

    New Member

    Jul 12, 2016
    12
    11
    The URL is quite valid. Perhaps this TinyURL will work to get someone there.
    http://tinyurl.com/h65secy
     
  17. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,492
    2,363
    4 year old thread!.
    Max.
     
  18. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    12,959
    3,214
    The purpose of the start capacitor is to create a rotating magnetic field in the auxiliary winding to start/run a single-phase induction motor, since such a motor won't start without help (single-phase induction motors will run without any help once started, but the explanation for that is somewhat complicated).
    Thus if the capacitor fails in such a motor it won't start, it will just sit there and hum.
    In effect the capacitor and auxiliary winding create a rotating field, similar to one created by a two-phase AC supply into a 2-phase motor (or 3-phase supply into a 3-phase motor).
     
    Louis Wilen likes this.
  19. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,492
    2,363
    A tad more ..1ph induction motor, without the start cap the field oscillates across 0-180°, so no revolutions, the start winding and cap are calculated to produce an almost 90° phase shift to this main current.
    The run winding current lags the applied voltage by a few degrees and the start voltage leads by almost the 90° producing the "2 phase' supply with optimum phase shift.
    Max.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2016
    Louis Wilen likes this.
  20. ohmster

    New Member

    Jul 12, 2016
    12
    11
    Yes this is a very old thread but will have new life because people like myself who are homeowners with limited funds, have to fix our own home A/C units. Mine stopped cooling the home and when I went outside to look at the condenser unit, the main exhaust fan was not turning and I could hear a loud hum from the unit. Obviously the unit has power but the fan, for whatever reason is not turning. I have worked as an electronic technician on home electronics for my entire life, but not with large A/C motors. This thread and the offered links for education got my home A/C repaired, for essentially $6 to pay for a new run capacitor for the fan instead of calling an A/C repair service and paying hundreds of dollars that I do not have right now. Without a thread like this and the education I got from it, I would never have been able to fix the outdoor condenser unit.

    The capacitors and circuits used in a large A/C motor are *nothing* like one would deal with fixing TV sets and stereos. The capacitors are unique and have a totally different purpose and function as used in a home A/C unit. I could not even measure them as the Fluke 85 DMM, a very handy and expensive meter, does not measure "microfarads". I took the caps into an A/C parts store and had them checked. The 10uF fan run capacitor was down to 3uF, clearly a bad part that must be replaced. Even if it did not repair the unit, it had to be replaced if ever this was to work. Fortunately, it did fix the unit and for the first time in days, I got a good night sleep without waking to a 90° degree home, soaked in sweat. So 4 years old or not, this thread has an ongoing, useful purpose and made the difference for me by allowing me to fix my own home A/C system. Thanks guys!

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2016
Loading...