ac motor question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by chaddyl, Nov 9, 2014.

  1. chaddyl

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 9, 2014
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    I have an ac motor and there's only black wires coming out of the stator. Is there any way to figure out which wires are what. What happened was I have a restaurant and there was a fire and it melted the wires from the drum switch all the way to about a foot from the motor. I have a new switch I just need to figure out where all these black wires go. Thanks
     
  2. chaddyl

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 9, 2014
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    It's a 3 phase motor with 6 wires and only goes in 1 direction with 2 speeds
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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  4. chaddyl

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 9, 2014
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    From the motor to the switch right in the middle all the wires were melted. The wires that are still connected to the switch have tabs on them labeling them but on on the motor so no I just have 6 wires coming out of the motor with no label or diagram. On the stator the wires just come out in a bundle.
     
  5. chaddyl

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 9, 2014
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    here's a pic
     
  6. JDT

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 12, 2009
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    Wires melted? Sounds bad!

    Best way to identify the wires is to use a resistance meter. There should be 3 independent windings. Using the resistance meter you should be able to pair them up. Once you have done that, they are connected in a star or delta connection (depending on the motor voltage - see the plate) to the supply. If the motor turns the wrong way, reverse one of the windings (any one).

    The resistance of each winding should be low - in the order of ohms. The resistance between the windings should be very high. If you think there might be some damage - motor overheating, for example, test the insulation between the windings, and between the windings and the frame, with a high-voltage insulation tester (500V) before powering-up.
     
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