AC - DC Converter

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by User_axpro, May 15, 2013.

  1. User_axpro

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2013
    8
    0
    Hi there,
    Quick question, In a theoretical project, what would be the max voltage a Bridge rectifier circuit with a capacitive filter could take ?
    Does anyone know a more efficient to transform AC - DC at higher voltages ?
    I have knoledge of designing AC-DC circuits to certain parameters but im sure i can pick up other information as i go, thanks in advance :)
     
  2. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
    737
    150
    Depends on the ratings of the rectifiers and capacitor used.

    “The better the question, the better the answer.”
     
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,063
    And you can put them is series to increase the total voltage without increasing the voltage across individual components.
     
  4. User_axpro

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 15, 2013
    8
    0
    Thank you for your replys, i know my question was quite vauge.
    If the AC-DC bridge rectifier circuit needed a PI filter to meet a certain ripple value could this be calculated re-arranging the following equations:
    [​IMG]
    to gain the capicitor value and divide by two for the equal capaitance, and obtain the inductance needed by re-arranging:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Shagas

    Active Member

    May 13, 2013
    802
    74
    Bridge rectifiers or diodes for that matter have high breakdown voltages of about 1000 volts or higher so I guess you could use them for some value less than that and concerning that capacitors, the voltage rating has to be twice as high as the voltage that you are working with ?
    Why what is this theoretical project that you are working on ? Are you trying to generate high voltages?
     
  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,063
    This is a completely different question than your first post, which has been more-or-less answered (we can't tell for sure because, as you agree, it was vague).

    What are you really trying to do? The pros around here are good with circuits. Mind reading not so much.
     
Loading...