About LTSpice

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Senz_90, May 19, 2014.

  1. Senz_90

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 11, 2013
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    Hi all. Good day. I am still learning and wanna ask some question and help.

    I don't know how to import a node on command prompt like this books suggest on LTSpice and maybe the SPICE is different? what is SPICE simulation tools on this forum books used?
    I want to learn calculate and simulate circuits and it seems hard to do that without any help, so anyone know a good site those give a good explanation/tutorial on LTspice? I would happy if the tutorial include some picture to make a better understanding.
     
  2. eetech00

    Active Member

    Jun 8, 2013
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    112
    Check the linear.com web site. They have video tutorials.

    Google "LTSpice Tutorial". There is a lot of tutorial out there...

    eT
     
  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    I don't understand what "import a node on command prompt" means. :confused:
     
  4. Senz_90

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 11, 2013
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    Thanks.

    crutschow. In the first chapter DC Ohm's Law there is explanation using SPICE with commond prompt, maybe I am understand wrong about this?
     
  5. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    That likely is referring to using a Spice circuit file directly without a schematic interface. LTspice is normally interfaced through the Schematic Entry GUI.
     
  6. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    The file being created is referred to as a netlist - a list of nodes and connections among various components, which Spice uses to run a simulation.

    Spice is a program, and what you are seeing is the program being supplied with the netlist and the results is the output of the program after running a simulation, all from the command line.

    LTSpice has a graphical interface, meaning you don't need to use the command line (though you could) to run a simulation on a circuit.
     
  7. Senz_90

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 11, 2013
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    Thank you. I am reading again and test it with command prompt and I am exactly wrong with my assumption. that is not same as I think. you both were right. I am make a few test resistor schematic with ltspice and it is really good. But I am not sure how to configure the simulation command. It looks like I have to read books to extend my knowledge further before try with this good software. I am still on chapter 2 about AC.
     
  8. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    Click the Simulate tab, then click on the "Run" command and the "Edit Simulation Command" window will appear. If you want to modify a simulation command, just right-click the simulation command on the schematic.
     
  9. Senz_90

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 11, 2013
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    I know how to click those button :D and I means I don't really sure how to configure/edit it, I just understand a little bit about dc op point.

    any guide how to configure it and what circuit need those configuration?
     
  10. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
    5,801
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    Have you tried pressing F1 to use the LTspice Help? It's fairly comprehensive (albeit somewhat cryptic in places).
     
  11. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    A couple of common Spice analyses are AC and transient.

    AC analysis operates in the frequency-domain and is for determining the sine-wave (only) frequency response characteristics of the circuit, thus the only signal source available is AC sine-wave. It uses a linear model of the circuit derived from the circuits DC operating point, and pays no attention to actual AC voltage levels, only relative values for determining attenuation and gain values of the signal through the circuit.

    The Transient analysis operates in the time-domain and uses the non-linear models of all the parts. It shows the operation of the circuit as an oscilloscope would, giving voltages and wave-shapes corresponding to the real circuit (within the limits of the simulation models). It has several different signal sources available, such a Pulse, Sine-wave, Exponential, PWL (PieceWise Linear), etc. depending upon what you need for the particular circuit being simulated.
     
  12. Senz_90

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 11, 2013
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    0
    I have read it but still don't understand well, it is looks like I have to stop from this and continue reading books and follow the step with some practical simulation to understand better how the circuit work.

    I am still learning Vol 2 AC and would like test it with ltspice after get a good understanding. it is a bit harder to understand than DC volume 1 . thank you very much for your explanation sir, it really help!!
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2014
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