About Electrical Wire

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Lightfire, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hello,

    I am just wondering if the voltage across the wire will be affected if I joined another more electric wire? The common wire that we put electrical wire.

    For example, I has 1 yard of wire and one more 1 yard of wire. Then I am going to connect them together to have 2 yards of wire using electrical wire.

    Now, my question is. If I am going to do that, the voltage of battery will be affected? Which I guess, no.

    Thank you very much.

    Is it okay to use wall outlets even my power supply is 12 volts DC. Just for low voltages purposes only.
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    The longer the wire the more voltage drop you will experience.

    And a regular outlet will work just fine for 12VDC BUT is not a good idea in case someone comes along and tried to plug something else into it. So it is highly recommended that you do not use a regular outlet as it is automatically assumed that any electrical connection with a wall outlet will be for 120VAC (or whatever voltage is in your country)
     
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  4. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    There is a much more important reason why you should not use a mains type outlet for low voltages.

    If you fit a mains plug to your 12V equipment, you (or someone else) might plug it in to the mains by mistake! :eek:

    The 12V equipment would be wrecked, and there could be a fire. Someone might get an electric shock - which could even kill.

    Please be careful.
     
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  5. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    What if my wire is 1 kilometer long? :)

    OK, but it is OK to use regular outlet for 12 volts DC? Just need some care?

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2011
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    If you look on the internet you will find tables describing ohm's/ft (or meter). Then it becomes a matter of using ohm's law to see if you can use it or not. Wire is very expensive though, so you don't run such lengths casually.
     
  7. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hey Bill!

    Thanks you came here! P.S. can you answer my question? ;D just one more. :D

     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    On this page:
    http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm
    is a calculator that will tell you how much voltage you will lose in a wire for a given load, given wire size, given distance, and type of wire (copper or aluminum).

    I strongly recommend against using plugs/receptacles designed for mains power for anything else BUT mains power, and devices that are designed to operate from mains power.

    There are many other types of jacks/plugs that are available for low voltage projects. It is not necessary or desirable to use mains power connectors for anything but mains power.
     
  9. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Why? Is there any problem? :)
     
  10. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    Mcgyvr answered these questions in post #3...
     
  11. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Yes. But I asked SgtWookie again just to know what his point why it is not recommended. Maybe their opinions are not the same...
     
  12. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    For the same reasons as described in post #3.

    Don't use mains connectors for 12v projects. No matter how careful YOU might be, sooner or later someone will plug them into mains power by mistake, and the result could be disastrous/fatal.
     
  13. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    But can I use AC designed wall outlet just for testing purposes only? uSING of 12 volts dc battery? :) Because I am afraid of 240 volts. :O: O_O

    P.S. can i put 12 volts halogen lamps on my celing that will be operated by a 12 volts dc battery so if there is apower outages, i can use it. or is it not allowed??? (promise, i will be safety)

    Thank you
     
  14. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I had a teacher in my college do that. It was for op amps, ±15V. A power connector seemed perfect, until a student got them confused. He was lucky, the 741 only cratered the protoboard (which at that time was provided by the school). That policy changed soon after.
     
  15. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    NO!

    Halogen lamps generate a LOT of heat. The lamps would have to be in a lamp holder/socket that is approved for the lamp wattage.

    You would be much better off to use LEDs for low-voltage lighting. Your 50W halogen lamp(s) will drain your battery very rapidly. LEDs can provide a fair amount of light without draining your battery too quickly.
     
  16. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    ok. i wont use wall oulet
    ;D
    ;D

    What led is it? the small one? or what? can you give me example???
     
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