About alligator clips with 2 wires

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Kardo22, Mar 12, 2014.

  1. Kardo22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2014
    26
    0
    I'm thinking how do they work. Usually there's 1 wire per clip.
    Does anyone have any insigths to how they work. I've even seen variants with 4 wires.
    The clip I'm thinking about looks like this:
    [​IMG]
    When testin, it is connected like this:
    [​IMG]
    And connected at the other end like this(only the 2 rigthmost wires):
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    Congratulation. You manages to post two pictures that show nothing.

    Can't see the probe end of the probe.

    Can't see the front panel markings of whatever instrument you have.

    If you post better pictures I'll tell you about a meter we use every day that has 4 wires.

    And welcome to the forums!
     
  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    is so your test device can perform multiple functions without having to change hookups during the test..
    I'd assume thats an AC/DC/IR/Ground bond tester.
     
  4. Kardo22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2014
    26
    0
    Sorry about that
    Heres 1 more picture of the testing(I'm holding the probe):
    [​IMG]

    A link to the tester:
    http://www.sefelec.com/en/produit.php?produit=2804
     
  5. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
    2,449
    428
    the only two lead clips or probes I have seen are for measuring low resistance.
     
  6. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,423
    3,359
    A pair of banana jacks -> one cable -> two mini plugs -> two clips

    means that the one cable is a coaxial cable, one center conductor and one shield.

    There is nothing magical about that.

    You don't connect the grey mini jack into the green mini jack. That is shorting the signal to ground.
     
  7. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    RTFM ;)

    A few styles of banana jacks have the ability to "piggyback" into each other..
    As I've already stated its so multiple tests can be performed without having to switch leads.. The safety tester takes care of the switching during measurements.
     
    Kardo22 likes this.
  8. Kardo22

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2014
    26
    0
    piggiback clips, didn't even think of a term like this
    I searched google but never found anything useful until I added 'piggyback'.

    Can these wires be used without the clip (jack)? If I wanted to connect them permanently, could I just connect the ends of the wires to the same point?
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    Sure.. you can always just cut off a banana jack and solder the wire directly to something for a more permanent installation.
     
    Kardo22 likes this.
  10. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    12,993
    3,227
    The cables would appear to be part of a 4-wire (Kelvin) connection to measure low resistances. For that you would connect four probes to all four connections from the two cables. Two of the four wires carry the measurement current and the other two measure the resulting voltage to determine the UUT resistance. That connection avoids measurement errors due to cable and probe resistance.
     
    Kardo22 likes this.
  11. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    Ermm... what picture? And that link is a dead end, so I can't see the details about the "electrical safety tester 2804"

    Anyway... crutschow beat me to what I was thinking: it's a 4-wire (or Kelvin) set up. I use those a lot for bonding measurements to check if there is a truly low resistance connection between items, and low is defined as 0.0025 ohms or less. (Note: 0.0025 ohms is NOT a typo.)

    Without a 4-wire test you could never measure anything that low.
     
Loading...